Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chesapeake Beach in Calvert County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Chesapeake Beach Historic Heritage Trail

 
 
Chesapeake Beach Historic Heritage Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 4, 2017
1. Chesapeake Beach Historic Heritage Trail Marker
Inscription. Near this spot in the early 20th century, steam trains from The Chesapeake Beach Railway discharged passengers from Washington DC. They arrived with great expectations for a busy day enjoying the many amusements of the beach and park. The park offered many activities: restaurants, arcade games, a scenic railway, a carousel, music at the band shell, and dancing pavilion. Most of these activities were located on the boardwalk over the water, which was 300 to 400 feet from the shore. The usual water-related pastimes, such as swimming, boating, fishing, and crabbing, were also available. On the adjacent shore there were pleasant picnic grounds, walking paths through shady groves, scenic overlooks over the Chesapeake Bay, sumptuous restaurants, and hotels for overnight accommodation. The grand roller coaster located over the water and known as the Great Derby, opened for operations in 1916 and survived for a decade. A Later roller coaster, called The Comet, was situated on land during the 1930’s and early 1940’s.

The amusement park had three distinct periods. The first was the era of the Boardwalk, dating from 1900 until 1930. In the summer of 1930, Seaside Park opened on land adjacent to the water. This land-based park survived through the summer of 1942; the park operations were curtailed by WWII. After the war, the park reopened
Chesapeake Beach Historic Heritage Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 4, 2017
2. Chesapeake Beach Historic Heritage Trail Marker
as Chesapeake Beach Park, and continued operation until finally closing in 1972. Two of the favorite places for enjoyment in the later park were the Ballroom and the Salt Water Swimming Pool.
 
Location. 38° 41.394′ N, 76° 32.055′ W. Marker is in Chesapeake Beach, Maryland, in Calvert County. Marker is at the intersection of Mears Avenue and "C" Street on Mears Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4192 Mears Avenue, Chesapeake Beach MD 20732, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Chesapeake Beach Railway Station (within shouting distance of this marker); Chesapeake Beach Railway (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Holly Hill (approx. 3.2 miles away); Harriet Elizabeth Brown (approx. 3˝ miles away); The First All Saints Church (approx. 4.3 miles away); All Saints Episcopal Church (approx. 4.4 miles away); Calvert County (approx. 5.7 miles away); A County in Ruin (approx. 5.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chesapeake Beach.
 
Categories. EntertainmentMan-Made FeaturesRailroads & Streetcars
 
Chesapeake Beach Railway image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 4, 2017
3. Chesapeake Beach Railway
Close-up of map on marker
Chesapeake Beach Resort image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 4, 2017
4. Chesapeake Beach Resort
This photo is on display at the Chesapeake Beach Railway Museum.

“Chesapeake Beach, as originally conceived, was a resort intended to rival Atlantic City and Coney Island. Its close proximity and rail construction to Washington, D.C. enticed thousands of visitors from the sweltering city to the cool breezes and salt water of the Chesapeake Bay. The boardwalk, which was destroyed in 1929-30, was lined with restaurants, souvenir shops, amusements, and games of chance.” – Chesapeake Beach Railway Museum.
Woman’s Bathing Dress<br> c. 1900 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 4, 2017
5. Woman’s Bathing Dress
c. 1900
On display at the Chesapeake Beach Railway Museum.

“The nautical style bathing dress was a popular standard style at the turn of the 20th century. The female body was well covered from head to toe in this swimming costume. A silk scarf or hat would have covered the head to complete the outfit. By the end of the first decade of the 20th century, women’s bathing suit fashions had adapted to more athletic and revealing styles.” –Chesapeake Beach Railway Museum
The Dancing Pavilion image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 4, 2017
6. The Dancing Pavilion
Close-up of photo on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 7, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 6, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 45 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 6, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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