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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Potlatch in Latah County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

Company Town

Built as a model town, Potlatch

 

—was owned by Weyerhaeuser's Potlatch Lumber Company —

 
Company Town Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2013
1. Company Town Marker
Inscription.
Spokane architect C. Ferris White designed the new community in 1905. Workers’ housing stood close to the mill. Managers’ homes were built away from the plant’s noise and smoke. The railroad depot separated town from industry. All company owned, Potlatch was complete with churches, school, gym, hospital, opera house, and company store.
 
Erected by Idaho State Historical Society & Idaho Transportation Department. (Marker Number 505.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Idaho State Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 46° 55.505′ N, 116° 54.165′ W. Marker is in Potlatch, Idaho, in Latah County. Marker is at the intersection of State Highway 6 and Onaway Road, on the left when traveling west on State Highway 6. Touch for map. Marker is located at a pull-out on the west side of Idaho highway 6, near the intersection with Onaway Road. There is a small, fenced, grassy area with two Potlatch town historical markers at this location. Marker is in this post office area: Potlatch ID 83855, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. World's Largest Mill (here, next to this marker); White Pine Scenic Byway
Company Town Marker (<i>wide view showing adjacent marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2013
2. Company Town Marker (wide view showing adjacent marker)
(approx. 0.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. A large wooden marker in good condition
 
Also see . . .
1. History of a North Idaho Company Town.
Potlatch was created in 1905 to provide homes for the 500 workers at the Potlatch Lumber Co. mill. Nineteen of the homes built by the company are on the National Register of Historic Places, and City Hall used to be the mill headquarters. The mill closed in 1981, and no major business activity has emerged to replace those lumber jobs. Potlatch so named for the company it held and supported, and for the largest white pine log mill in the United States, it was the place the workers of the mill called home. Back in the day, it was nearly 3 times the population it is today. (Submitted on November 22, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Potlatch Corporation History.
As the railroads brought settlers to the Western frontier, stories of the land's riches were carried back east. Northern Idaho, cut off from the southern part of the state by the deep gorge of the Salmon River, was uncharted for the most part, but many Midwestern timbermen began to hear of the area's towering stands of white pine and other valuable trees. Frederick Weyerhaeuser of St. Paul, Minnesota--a powerful lumber capitalist and one of the founders of Potlatch--saw an exhibit of Idaho timberland at Chicago's 1893 World's
Potlatch Railroad Depot (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2013
3. Potlatch Railroad Depot (wide view)
Fair, and it was he who led the charge of Midwest lumber companies to the Northwest. He did this with the help of the 'Weyerhaeuser syndicate,' a group of Midwestern businessmen who had long worked together to secure timber for their individual mills. (Submitted on November 22, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Washington, Idaho & Montana, (W.I. & M.), Railroad History.
On September 30, 1905, the first passenger car moved over the tracks when the private car of Frederick Weyerhaeuser, who was on his way to make an inspection tour of Potlatch town and mill site, was transferred to the WI&M line at Palouse. On Sunday, November 12, 1905, rail traffic service to Potlatch was formally opened when William Deary, W.W. Laird, and 500 guests took an excursion train from Palouse to Potlatch. The train consisted of one passenger car and three flat cars equipped with seats. The twelve mile trip took 42 minutes. On December 9 the first scheduled daily run, extending to Princeton, began. (Submitted on November 22, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers
 
Potlatch Railroad Depot image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2013
4. Potlatch Railroad Depot
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 71 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4. submitted on November 22, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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