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Soda Springs in Caribou County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

Travertine Terraces - World Famous Water

 
 
Travertine Terraces - World Famous Water Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 15, 2013
1. Travertine Terraces - World Famous Water Marker
Inscription. The gently sloping mound around the geyser is travertine. The stone often develops into flights of pools enclosed within little dams. These dams form through a mix of water and carbon dioxide which makes carbonic acid, and dissolved calcium carbonate. Carbonic acid is the same weak acid that makes soda water taste slightly sour. When the carbon dioxide evaporates from a thin film of water on the lip of a pool, a layer of calcium carbonate is deposited because the water becomes less acidic in that particular spot.

The mineral springs in the area were a remarkable phenomenon to pioneers and, for a period of time, made Soda Springs world famous. A bottling plant was set up at nearby Ninety Percent Spring in 1997. Huge drums were put over Mammoth Spring, to trap escaping carbon dioxide, which was piped 5 miles over the mountain to the bottling works. Here the bottles were filled with water from Ninety Percent Spring and charged with gas from Mammoth Spring 5 miles north of here, to make carbonated water.

Bottled water was shipped by the railway carload to eastern markets and to foreign countries, bringing prosperity and fame to Soda Springs. An early ad calls it “the highest class naturally carbonated water in the world.” Known as Idan-ha, the water took first prize at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893
Travertine Terraces - World Famous Water Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 15, 2013
2. Travertine Terraces - World Famous Water Marker (wide view)
and at the 1905 World’s Fair in Paris. One can still sample the sparkling waters mentioned by emigrants at nearby Hooper Springs, one mile north of town, or Octagon Spring just north of the railroad tracks. The onset of prohibition and new technology to artificially inject carbon dioxide into water brought the demise of the Idan-ha bottling works.

Celebrating its location adjacent to the Oregon Short Line railroad and mineral waters, the luxurious Idan-ha Hotel was dedicated in 1887. The governors of Utah and Idaho declared the new hotel the “finest hostelry in the territory.” The 42-room hotel catered to the elite and later operated as a dining station for the Union Pacific Railroad. Unfortunately, the hotel, located at the southeast corner of Hooper Avenue and Main Street, burned in 1921.
 
Location. 42° 39.451′ N, 111° 36.305′ W. Marker is in Soda Springs, Idaho, in Caribou County. Marker can be reached from South Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is located in Geyser Park, along the boardwalk at the north end of the park. Marker is at or near this postal address: East First Street South, Soda Springs ID 83276, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. "It Roars Like a Mad Dragon" (within shouting distance of this marker); The Springs of Soda Springs
Marker Detail: Travertine Cross-section image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 15, 2013
3. Marker Detail: Travertine Cross-section
(within shouting distance of this marker); George W. and Leah Wallet Gorton (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Ground Observer Corps National Planning (about 300 feet away); Ground Observation Corps Soda Springs Post (about 300 feet away); Caribou Mountain (about 300 feet away); Ground Observer Corps National Campaign (about 400 feet away); Wagon Box Grave of 1861 (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Soda Springs.
 
Also see . . .
1. Soda Springs.
Soda Springs has a rich history starting when the Pioneers headed west for California and Oregon. Due to the abundance of springs and water in the area, Soda Springs became known as the "Oregon Trail Oasis." The famous Steam Boat Springs and Hooper Springs, which was originally called "Beer Springs," were some of the main sites to be seen by the earlier settlers and travelers as well as the many sulfurous springs that many pioneers journaled about the smell coming from the them. The City later became further famous in 1937 when a well was being drilled in search of hot water for a bath house that unleashed what is known as the
Marker Detail: Idan-ha Label image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 15, 2013
4. Marker Detail: Idan-ha Label
Geyser, which is the only captive Geyser in the world. (Submitted on November 12, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Geyser Park.
The Soda Springs Geyser is a captive system artesian geyser discovered in 1937. It is located on Pyramid Spring, a travertine mound described by Fremont in his 1840s expeditions (Submitted on November 12, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Travertine.
Travertine is a form of limestone deposited by mineral springs, especially hot springs. Travertine often has a fibrous or concentric appearance and exists in white, tan, cream-colored, and even rusty varieties. It is formed by a process of rapid precipitation of calcium carbonate, often at the mouth of a hot spring or in a limestone cave. Travertine is a terrestrial sedimentary rock, formed by the precipitation of carbonate minerals from solution in ground and surface waters, and/or geothermally heated hot-springs. (Submitted on November 12, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesRailroads & Streetcars
 
Marker Detail: Idan-ha Hotel image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 15, 2013
5. Marker Detail: Idan-ha Hotel
Travertine Terrace Adjacent to Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 15, 2013
6. Travertine Terrace Adjacent to Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 15, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 12, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 45 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 12, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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