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Bluefield in Tazewell County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Tazewell County Va./West Virginia

 
 
Tazewell County VA (side facing north into West Virginia, seen approaching Virgina line from north) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 21, 2017
1. Tazewell County VA (side facing north into West Virginia, seen approaching Virgina line from north)
Inscription. (obverse)
Tazewell County Va.
Area 531 Square Miles


Formed in 1799 from Russell and Wythe, and named for Henry Tazewell, United States Senator, 1794-1799. Beautiful Burk's Garden is in this county.

(reverse)
West Virginia

West Virginia was long a part of Virginia. Morgan Morgan began the settlement of the region in 1727. A great battle took place at Point Pleasant, 1774. West Virginia became a separate state of the Union in 1863.
 
Erected 1929 by Conservation & Development Commission. (Marker Number Z-222.)
 
Location. 37° 15.412′ N, 81° 15.455′ W. Marker is in Bluefield, Virginia, in Tazewell County. Marker is on Trail of the Lonesome Pine (Virginia Avenue) (U.S. 19) 0.2 miles north of Meadoes Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at the Virginia state line. Marker is in this post office area: Bluefield VA 24605, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bluefield College (approx. 1.1 miles away); Bluefield State College (approx. 1.4 miles away in West Virginia); Bluefield State Teacherís College
West Virginia (side facing south into Virginia, seen approaching West Virginia from south) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 21, 2017
2. West Virginia (side facing south into Virginia, seen approaching West Virginia from south)
(approx. 1.4 miles away in West Virginia); West Virginia / Mercer County (approx. 1.6 miles away in West Virginia); Elizabeth Kee (approx. 2.1 miles away in West Virginia); Bluefield (approx. 2.1 miles away in West Virginia); Andrew Davidson (approx. 2.7 miles away in West Virginia); Bluefield Virginia (approx. 2.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bluefield.
 
Regarding Tazewell County Va./West Virginia. North-facing marker side is about Tazewell County Virginia (beyond the marker heading south) and South-facing marker side is about West Virginia (beyond the marker heading north)
 
Also see . . .
1. Tazewell County Virginia History.
Tazewell was first farmed about 1770 by pioneers from Maryland and became a Virginia county on December 19, 1799. To the legislators in the more populated eastern part of the state the mountains of southwest Virginia were a mystery, a rugged and dangerous territory that extended into much of what is now West Virginia. When residents petitioned to form a county, one influential legislator, Delegate Littleton Waller Tazewell of Williamsburg objected. When sponsors of
Tazewell County VA. Marker Side (<i>wide view from north</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 21, 2017
3. Tazewell County VA. Marker Side (wide view from north)
the county decided overnight to name it after his popular father, U.S. Sen. Henry Tazewell, who had died a few months earlier, he withdrew his objection. (Submitted on November 14, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Morgan Morgan.
Morgan Morgan (November 1, 1688-November 17, 1766) is traditionally considered the first white settler of West Virginia. He was born in Wales and emigrated to Delaware about 1712. About 1714, Morgan met and married Catherine Garretson, with whom he had nine children. He was a merchant tailor and coroner and achieved enough standing in the Delaware colony to be one of the executors of the will of its lieutenant governor, John Evans. Morgan, Catherine, and five of their children moved to Virginia about 1729. (Submitted on November 14, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Battle of Point Pleasant.
It is important that Americans should know our own history and its significance in the great revolutionary struggle, in which the Battle of Point Pleasant was the first conflict waged by the American Colonists in defense of the Colonies, wherein they met in battle the allies of the English, the great federated Indian tribes, commanded by Chief Cornstalk. It was the deadliest battle ever waged by red men since the discovery of America. It was incited by Dunmore, the Tory Governor of Virginia, and his trusted lieutenants. (Submitted on November 14, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
West Virginia Marker Side (<i>wide view from south</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 21, 2017
4. West Virginia Marker Side (wide view from south)
 
 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 15, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 14, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 38 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 14, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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