Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Clifton in Fairfax County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Sangster’s Station

“Tears And Love For the Blue—Love and Tears for the Grey”

 
 
Sangster’s Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 14, 2017
1. Sangster’s Station Marker
Inscription. During the Civil War, the Orange & Alexandria Railroad was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederate armies. Sangster's Station, located 1-3/4 miles to your right where Colchester Road crosses under the railroad tracks, was the site of at least two engagements.

In March 1862, Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston abandoned his northern Virginia lines and led his army south to defend Richmond. As the last of his forces neared the Rappahannock River on March 9, Union cavalrymen advancing from Alexandria encountered a Confederate rear guard at Sangster's Station. During the fight, Lt. Henry B. Hidden of the 1st New York (Lincoln) Cavalry was killed leading 14 dragoons in a charge. The Confederates continued to withdraw.

On the evening of December 17, 1863, during a winter lightning storm, Sangster's came under attack for the second and last time. Confederate cavalry of the Laurel Brigade, with local soldiers of the Chinquapin Rangers as guides, captured a Union stockade fort guarding the railroad there. The Confederate raid, which began near Fredericksburg, ended in the Shenandoah Valley. En route, some of the troopers drowned crossing swollen waterways while others had soaked clothing freeze to their saddles as the cold rain turned to snow and sleet.

(sidebar)
In 1849, Edward
Sangster’s Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 14, 2017
2. Sangster’s Station Marker
and Mary Sangster sold part of their land to the Orange & Alexandria Railroad Company. A station house was built nearby, and a post office was opened in March 1852. The county poor farm was located at Sangster's from 1842 to 1911.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Location. 38° 46.856′ N, 77° 23.208′ W. Marker is in Clifton, Virginia, in Fairfax County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Main Street (Virginia Route 645) and Ford Lane, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7145 Main Street, Clifton VA 20124, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Devereux Station (a few steps from this marker); Buckley Store (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Devereux Station (within shouting distance of this marker); Clifton Baptist Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Clifton Presbyterian Church (about 500 feet away); Wm. E. Beckwith House (about 500 feet away); Clifton Primitive Baptist Church (about 700 feet away); Ivakota Farm (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Clifton.
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
Sangster’s Station, 1864 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 14, 2017
3. Sangster’s Station, 1864
Close-up of photo on marker
The Cavalry Charge of Lt. Henry B. Hidden<br>by Victor Nelig image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 14, 2017
4. The Cavalry Charge of Lt. Henry B. Hidden
by Victor Nelig
Close-up of image on marker
Monument image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 14, 2017
5. Monument
Monument to the Laurel Brigade’s assault on Co. I, 155th New York Volunteers (Corcoran's Irish Legion). It stood near the Poor Farm at Sangster’s until vandals dismantled it in the 1960s. The Fairfax Station Railroad Museum now holds the white bronze plates on loan.
Close-up of photos on marker
Map image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 14, 2017
6. Map
Civil War-era map of Fairfax County showing Orange & Alexandria Railroad and stations including Sangster's
Close-up of map on marker
Lt. Henry B. Hidden image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
7. Lt. Henry B. Hidden
The Bunnyman Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 14, 2017
8. The Bunnyman Bridge
This underpass through which Colchester Road passes under the Railroad marks the location of Sangster’s Station. The bridge is famous as “The Bunnyman Bridge” because of an urban legend involving a murderous maniac dressed in a bunny costume who is said to have committed several murders there.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 30, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 16, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on November 16, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement