Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
London Borough of Camden in Greater London County, England, United Kingdom
 

Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett

1847 - 1929

 
 
Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 11, 2017
1. Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett Marker
Inscription.
pioneer of
women's suffrage
lived and
died here

 
Erected 1954 by London County Council.
 
Location. 51° 31.195′ N, 0° 7.778′ W. Marker is in London Borough of Camden, England, in Greater London County. Marker is at the intersection of Gower Street and Montague Place, on the left when traveling south on Gower Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2 Gower Street, London Borough of Camden, England WC1E 6DP, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lady Ottoline Morrell (within shouting distance of this marker); Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood (within shouting distance of this marker); Robert Aickman (within shouting distance of this marker); Lord Eldon (within shouting distance of this marker); Bedford College for Women (about 150 meters away, measured in a direct line); First Anaesthesia in England (about 180 meters away); Topham and Lady Diana Beauclerk (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); T.S. Eliot (approx. 0.3 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in London Borough of Camden.
 
Also see . . .
1. Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett (Encyclopedia). "Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett, née
Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 11, 2017
2. Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett Marker - Wide View
Garrett (born June 11, 1847, Aldeburgh, Suffolk, Eng. — died Aug. 5, 1929, London), leader for 50 years of the movement for woman suffrage in England. From the beginning of her career she had to struggle against almost unanimous male opposition to political rights for women; from 1905 she also had to overcome public hostility to the militant suffragists led by Emmeline Pankhurst and her daughter Christabel, with whose violent methods Fawcett was not in sympathy. She also was a founder of Newnham College, Cambridge (planned from 1869, established 1871), one of the first English university colleges for women." (Submitted on November 18, 2017.) 

2. Millicent Fawcett (Wikipedia). "Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett, GBE (11 June 1847 – 5 August 1929) was an English feminist, intellectual, political and union leader, and writer. She is primarily known for her work as a campaigner for women to have the vote....As a suffragist (as opposed to a suffragette), she took a moderate line, but was a tireless campaigner. She concentrated much of her energy on the struggle to improve women's opportunities for higher education and in 1875 co-founded Newnham College, Cambridge. She later became president of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (the NUWSS), a position she held from 1897 until 1919. In July
<i>Mrs. Millicent Garrett Fawcett, seated with book</i> image. Click for full size.
Bain News Service (photograph courtesy of the Library of Congress), November 18, 2017
3. Mrs. Millicent Garrett Fawcett, seated with book
1901 she was appointed to lead the British government's commission to South Africa to investigate conditions in the concentration camps that had been created there in the wake of the Second Boer War...." (Submitted on November 18, 2017.) 

3. Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett (English Heritage). "Millicent had moved to Gower Street in 1884 – following the death of her husband, Henry Fawcett, who had been a Liberal minister – and died there 45 years later. When she moved in – together with her daughter Philippa (1868–1948), a fellow suffrage campaigner – it was already the residence of her sister Agnes (1845–1935), who was well known as an interior designer, and was responsible for two decorated ceilings at the house. She proved a supportive and strong companion for the widowed Millicent, who, in her own words, ‘always loved the Gower Street house and all its associations’." (Submitted on November 18, 2017.) 
 
Additional keywords. feminist
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicCivil RightsEducationWomen
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 18, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 18, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 49 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 18, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
Paid Advertisement