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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Keauhou in Hawaii County, Hawaii — Hawaiian Island Archipelago (Pacific Ocean)
 

Royal Center at Keauhou Bay

 
 
Royal Center at Keauhou Bay Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 24, 2017
1. Royal Center at Keauhou Bay Marker
Caption: Keauhou Bay landing circa 1890
Inscription. In the time of the ruler 'Umi-a-Liloa, 22 generations before the time of King Kamehameha I, the Royal Center moved away from Waipi'o in the island's northern region. As a result of this move, Royal Centers developed along Kona's leeward coast, By the 1600s through the early 1800s, seven Royal Centers were well established in Kona including one located at Kahalu'u and one here at Keauhou.
A Royal Center typically contained residences for the ruling chief and those of the high chiefs, and a complex of sacred areas and significant heiau (stone temples). Other structures often included house sites for family and kahuna (priests), and areas for daily life activities. An abundance of natural resources, recreation opportunities and canoe landings were essential features.
Ocean access at Keauhou Bay is superb and, just as boats use it today, canoe landings once dotted the shore. In the early 1800s, King Kamehameha I and his royal family occasionally resided on the northern shore of Keauhou Bay, on land between Puco and Ha'ikaua Cove. Puco Cove served as the royal canoe landing.
The canoe was a principal means of travel in ancient Hawai'i. Paddlers of a chief's canoe were highly trained, giving him the freedom of ocean mobility regardless of wind conditions.
Before motorized transportation, canoes provided people with easy
Royal Center at Keauhou Bay Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 24, 2017
2. Royal Center at Keauhou Bay Marker
access for short coastal trips between villages. Travel by canoe was much faster than on foot, and the canoe could be used for fishing or to carry goods. Hawaiian canoes were also used to cross open-ocean channels of long distance travel between islands.
 
Erected by Keauhou Resort and Hawai'i Tourism.
 
Location. 19° 33.647′ N, 155° 57.722′ W. Marker is in Keauhou, Hawaii, in Hawaii County. Marker is on Kaleiopapa Street near Ehukai Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 78-7138 Kaleiopapa Street, Keauhou HI 96739, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Kamehameha Dynasty (within shouting distance of this marker); Kauikeaouli and Nāhi'ena'ena (within shouting distance of this marker); Keauhou Bay (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Birthplace of Kauikeaouli (about 300 feet away); Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III (about 300 feet away); Keauhou - Kahalu'u Heritage Corridor (approx. 0.6 miles away); Inikiwai Ku'ula Heiau (approx. mile away); Lonoikamakahiki Residence (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Keauhou.
 
More about this marker. This marker is across from the Green Flash Too cafe.

The marker is part of the Keauhou-Kahalu'u Heritage Corridor.
 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 19, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 19, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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