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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Deanwood in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Day at the Picture Show

A Self-Reliant People

 

—Greater Deanwood Heritage Trail —

 
A Day at the Picture Show Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
1. A Day at the Picture Show Marker
Inscription. The Two-Story Art Deco Style Building on your left was once the Strand Theater. Abe Lichtman, a Jewish businessman whose movie theaters catered to black patrons, opened the Strand in 1918. Lichtman also operated the Lincoln and Howard theaters in the Shaw neighborhood of Northwest DC.

At the 600-seat Strand, adults initially paid 15 cents and children paid 10 for first-run movies on Saturday afternoons. The Strand building also housed a pool room, dance hall, pharmacy, and doctor's office.

From 1972 until 2008, the original H.D. Woodson Senior High School stood about a block to your right. Far Northeast's only high school was an innovative, nine-story academic vocational school intended to inspire its community. Instead, over time diminishing city funding, lack of maintenance, and design flaws led to its deterioration, demolition and replacement.

The school's name, though, reflected its community's aspirations. Howard Dilworth Woodson (1876 - 1962) was a Deanwood leader and one of a handful of black licensed architectural engineers in the District. He spent 36 years designing government buildings throughout the United States as well as hundreds of private structures in DC. Locally he designed Union Station's roof, the Metropolitan Baptist and Vermont Avenue Baptist churches, and houses along 49th
A Day at the Picture Show Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
2. A Day at the Picture Show Marker
Place in Deanwood. Woodson led residents in successful battles for public schools and parks, water and sewer systems, street paving and lighting. And he helped form key civic groups, including the Northeast Boundary Civic Association, the Far Northeast Council, and the Far Northeast Business and Professional Association.
 
Erected by The Greater Deanwood Heritage Trail. (Marker Number 2 of 15.)
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 38° 53.89′ N, 76° 55.549′ W. Marker was in Deanwood, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker was at the intersection of Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue Northeast and Division Avenue Northeast, on the left when traveling north on Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue Northeast. Touch for map. Marker was at or near this postal address: 5131 Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue Northeast, Washington DC 20019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Watts Going On (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Butterflies (about 600 feet away); National Training School for Women and Girls/ Nannie Helen Burroughs (approx. 0.2 miles away); From Rural to Residential (approx. 0.3 miles away); A Whirl on the Ferris Wheel
The Strand Building image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
3. The Strand Building
Close-up of photo on rear of marker
(was approx. 0.3 miles away but has been reported missing. ); Lederer Gardens (approx. 0.3 miles away); From Gardens to Garden Apartments (approx. 0.4 miles away); Original Federal Boundary Stone NE 9 (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Deanwood.
 
Categories. African AmericansEducationIndustry & Commerce
 
The Strand Building image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
4. The Strand Building
The Strand Pharmacy image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
5. The Strand Pharmacy
The Strand Pharmacy operated alongside the theater.
Close-up of photo on marker
Strand image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
6. Strand
Sledding image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
7. Sledding
Harold Woodson and nephew Jon sled near the family home at 4918 Fitch Pl., 1948.
Close-up of photo on marker
Harold Woodson's Parents image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
8. Harold Woodson's Parents
Harold's parents, Paulina and Howard D. Woodson
Close-up of photo on marker
Testimonial image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
9. Testimonial
Civic leader H. D. Woodson recieves a testimonial, 1956.
Close-up of photo on marker
Woodson Designs image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
10. Woodson Designs
Among Woodson's designs: the roof of Union Station, above-, Vermont Avenue Baptist Church, right, and Metropolitan Baptist Church, far right.
Swimming Pool image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
11. Swimming Pool
Innovations at the original Woodson High School in 1972 included the swimming pool, where students received SCUBA diving certification, and the music lab.
Music Lab image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
12. Music Lab
H. D. Woodson High School image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 7, 2017
13. H. D. Woodson High School
Architect's rendering of the first H. D. Woodson High School.
Close-up of photo on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 30, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 7, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 82 times since then. Last updated on November 23, 2017, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 7, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8, 9. submitted on June 10, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   10, 11, 12. submitted on June 17, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   13. submitted on June 20, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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