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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sevierville in Sevier County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Battle of Fair Garden

Furious Clash of Cavalry

 
 
Battle of Fair Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, June 3, 2017
1. Battle of Fair Garden Marker
Inscription. On January 25, 1864, Confederate Gen. James Longstreet ordered Gen. William T. Martin to eject Union cavalry from an area south of the French Broad River stretching from Dandridge to the Little Pigeon River. The next day, Union Gen. Samuel D. Sturgis directed his cavalrymen to watch area fords. Two Confederate cavalry brigades and artillery advanced from Fair Garden in the afternoon, only to be stopped about four miles from Sevierville. Other Confederates attached Union troopers at Fowler's on Flat Creek, driving them back about two miles before fighting ended the day.

The morning of January 27, in a heavy fog, Col. Archibald Campbell and elements of the First Cavalry Division (2nd Michigan Cavalry, 9th Indiana Cavalry, and Capt. Eli Lilly's "Hoosier" Light Artillery Battery) attacked Martin's Crossroads. The Federals fought all day across the farms of Stewart Dickey, Dr. Robert Hodsden, and John McNutt. At about 4 p.m., Federal cavalry charged with drawn sabers to scatter the Confederates, and then bivouacked for the night. Sturgis pursued the Southerners on January 28 with his entire force to the French Broad River near Dandridge before three of Longstreet's infantry brigades offered serious resistance. Realizing that he was outgunned, Sturgis prudently decided to evacuate the area, but first launched an unsuccessful attack
Battle of Fair Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, June 3, 2017
2. Battle of Fair Garden Marker
against Confederate Gen. Frank C. Armstrong's isolated cavalry division. Sturgis lost the foraging grounds when forced to withdraw. The Federals suffered about 65 casualties, and the Confederates lost about 100 men.

(captions)
Gen. James Longstreet Courtesy Library of Congress

Gen. Samuel D. Sturgis Courtesy Library of Congress

Capt. Eli Lilly, who founded the pharmaceutical firm Eli Lilly & Co. in 1876 - Courtesy Eli Lilly & Co.

Federal troops used Stewart Dickey's home as their headquarters and hospital, installing a telegraph line from there to their main base in Knoxville. - Courtesy King Family Library History Center

Dr. Robert Hodsden, a Union loyalist, lay bedridden in his home, rose Glen, during the battle. He had been a physician on the Trail of Tears (Cherokee Removal) in the 1830s. Courtesy Sally Ripatti Polhemus
 
Erected 2013 by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 51.699′ N, 83° 29.895′ W. Marker is near Sevierville, Tennessee, in Sevier County. Marker can be reached from Jim Hickman Drive north of Old Newport Highway, on the left
Battle of Fair Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, June 3, 2017
3. Battle of Fair Garden Marker
when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located outside the Connor-Short Center on the Walters State Community College - Sevier Campus. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1720 Old Newport Hwy, Sevierville TN 37876, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sweden Furnace (approx. 0.6 miles away); Harrisburg Covered Bridge (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named Harrisburg Covered Bridge (approx. 0.9 miles away); Forks of Little Pigeon Church (approx. 3.6 miles away); Forks of The River Cemetery Park (approx. 3.6 miles away); Forks of the Little Pigeon Cemetery (approx. 3.6 miles away); Thomas Atchley (approx. 3.8 miles away); James McMahan (approx. 3.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sevierville.
 
Also see . . .  Fair Garden. (Submitted on November 24, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 3, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 24, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 41 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 24, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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