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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Kingsland in Llano County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Antlers Caboose Rooms

 
 
The Antlers Caboose Rooms Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2013
1. The Antlers Caboose Rooms Marker
Inscription.
The cabooses were built by the International Railway Car Company for the Norfolk & Western Railroad. Each weighs 54,000 pounds and went into service in 1969 (Red), 1970 (Green), and 1976 (Yellow). The three different heralds painted on the sides refer to the railroads that served Kingsland, Texas.

During the 1920s, over 30,000 “crummies,” or cabooses, were registered in the United States. Conductors and railroad crews used them as offices, watched for fires from the cupolas, and signaled the engineer the location of the last train car. By the 1980s, modern railroad technology made cabooses obsolete.

The Antlers purchased the cabooses in 1996 at auction in Decatur, Illinois, had them moved by rail to Kingsland, and refurbished them into hotel rooms. Each has a living area, kitchen, queen bed, small bunk beds, and a bath. The observation cupolas are still intact. Reservation information is available in The Antlers Hotel lobby.
 
Location. 30° 39.602′ N, 98° 26.133′ W. Marker is in Kingsland, Texas, in Llano County. Marker is at the intersection of King Court and East FM Road 1431, on the right when traveling west on King Court. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1001 King Court, Kingsland TX 78639, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Austin & Northwestern Logo Caboose image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2013
2. Austin & Northwestern Logo Caboose
At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. McKinley Coach (within shouting distance of this marker); Antlers Hotel (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fisher - Miller - Grant (approx. 1 miles away); Hoover's Valley Cemetery (approx. 4 miles away); Longhorn Caverns (approx. 5.3 miles away); Longhorn Cavern Administration Building (approx. 5.3 miles away); C.S.A. Salt Works (approx. 5.4 miles away); Early Explorers in Llano County (approx. 5.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kingsland.
 
Also see . . .
1. Austin & Northwestern Railroad.
On April 29, 1881, the Austin and North Western Rail Road Company was incorporated to build a line from Austin to a connection with the Texas and Pacific at Abilene, along with branch lines including one to a point on the Rio Grande. The railroad carried all of the granite from Granite Mountain, nearly 16,000 carloads, used to build the state Capitol. Several cars derailed near Brush Creek in Travis County, and granite blocks can still be found in the streambed. The Austin and Northwestern was profitable throughout the latter half of the 1880s and the 1890s; most of its income was generated by the transport of mineral resources. In 1901 the state legislature approved the merger of the Austin and Northwestern into the Houston and Texas Central, which occurred on August 22 of that
Houston & Texas Central Logo Caboose image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2013
3. Houston & Texas Central Logo Caboose
year. (Submitted on November 29, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Houston and Texas Central Railway.
On January 1, 1853, Paul Bremond and Thomas William House broke ground for the G&RR at Houston. Although early progress was slow, considerable grading had been completed by the end of 1855. Track laying began in early 1856, and the rails reached Cypress City, the twenty-five-mile point, on July 26, 1856. On September 1, 1856, the company was renamed Houston and Texas Central Railway Company. By April 22, 1861, the railroad was open eighty-one miles to Millican, but the Civil War prevented any additional construction until 1867. The H&TC reached Corsicana in 1871, Dallas in 1872, and Denison in 1873. (Submitted on November 29, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Texas & New Orleans Railroad.
The Texas and New Orleans Railroad Company was one of the antebellum railroads of Texas. It was chartered on September 1, 1856, as the Sabine and Galveston Bay Railroad and Lumber Company, for the purpose of constructing a railroad from Madison (now Orange) in Orange County to the tidewater of Galveston Bay. The railroad was used extensively as a Confederate supply line, and about 1,000 soldiers were assigned to protect it and to keep it operating during the war. Scheduled service was operated from Houston to Orange from 1862 to mid-1863 and irregular
Southern Pacific Logo Caboose image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2013
4. Southern Pacific Logo Caboose
service until early 1864. In 1881 C. P. Huntington, acting for the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, bought the Texas and New Orleans and Louisiana Western. (Submitted on November 29, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. The Antlers Inn. (Submitted on December 2, 2017.)
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesRailroads & Streetcars
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 2, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 29, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 62 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 29, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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