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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Augusta in Kennebec County, Maine — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Cushnoc Trading Post / Le Comptoir Commercial De Cushnoc

The Museum in the Streets

 
 
Cushnoc Trading Post / Le Comptoir Commercial De Cushnoc Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 30, 2017
1. Cushnoc Trading Post / Le Comptoir Commercial De Cushnoc Marker
Inscription.

An endless quest for riches brought Europeans to the Kennebec River by 1607 and to Augusta by 1625. In 1628, the Plymouth (Massachusetts) Colony constructed Cushnoc Trading Post on the Kennebec riverbank at the head of navigation, and active trade began with the Abenaki people in the area. Wealth gained from central Maine's fur-bearing animals helped the Colony pay off debt to their English sponsors. By 1661, Cushnoc was no longer profitable, so the post and patent granting trading rights were sold to four Boston merchants who continued sporadic trade for fourteen years. Continued English encroachment and Abenaki efforts to preserve their way of life led to increased conflict on the Maine frontier—conflict that would last for over 80 years.

C'est la poursuite insatiable de richesse qui mena les Européens au fleuve Kennebec en 1607 et à Augusta en 1625. En 1628, la colonie de Plymouth (Massachusetts) construisit le comptoir commercial de Cushnoc sur la berge du Kennebec à la limite de la navigation et commenca un commerce florissant avec la population Abénaki de la région. La richesse acquise par le commerce de la fourrure au centre du Maine permit à la Colonie de s'acquitter de ses dettes envers ses promoteurs anglais. En 1661, Cushnoc n'était plus profitable, alors le magasin et la licence commerciale furent

Illustration on Cushnoc Trading Post / Le Comptoir Commercial De Cushnoc Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 30, 2017
2. Illustration on Cushnoc Trading Post / Le Comptoir Commercial De Cushnoc Marker
vendus à quatre marchands de Boston qui y firent un commerce sproadique pendant quartorze ans. L'empiètement continu des Anglais sur les Abénakis et les efforts de ces derniers pour préserver leur mode de vie occasionnaient de nombreux conflits à la frontière du Maine - des conflits qui durèrent plus de 80 ans.

[Illustration caption reads]
Sketch of trading post from the cover of Cushnoc: The History and Archaeology of Plymouth Colony Traders on the Kennebec, by Leon Crannec
 
Erected by Augusta Historic Preservation Commission, Kennebec Savings Bank, and the Maine Community Foundation. (Marker Number 1.)
 
Location. 44° 18.925′ N, 69° 46.286′ W. Marker is in Augusta, Maine, in Kennebec County. Touch for map. Marker is on the Old Fort Western grounds. Marker is at or near this postal address: 16 Cony Street, Augusta ME 04330, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1775 Quebec Expedition (here, next to this marker); Cushnoc Trading Post (a few steps from this marker); Gunshots Reverberate on the Kennebec / Des coups de fusil résonnent sur le fleuve Kennebec (within shouting distance of this marker); Birds and Fish of the Kennebec

Cushnoc Trading Post / Le Comptoir Commercial De Cushnoc Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 30, 2017
3. Cushnoc Trading Post / Le Comptoir Commercial De Cushnoc Marker
Looking north toward Old Fort Western and the brick Old City Hall beyond.
(about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Fort Western / Le vieux Fort Western (about 400 feet away); First Kennebec Bridge / Le premier pont du Kennebec (about 400 feet away); Sousa the nonpariel / L'incomparable Souza (about 400 feet away); Steamboat Landing / L'embarquement des bateaux à vapeur (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Augusta.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Museum in the Streets Tour Map, Augusta, Maine. (Submitted on November 30, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. John Howland and Courage on the Kennebec in Maine. (Submitted on November 30, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraIndustry & CommerceNative Americans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 1, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 30, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 63 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 1, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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