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Marshall in Harrison County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Governor Edward Clark

 
 
Governor Edward Clark Marker (<i>front side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
1. Governor Edward Clark Marker (front side)
Inscription.
(front)
Home Town Texas First Confederate
Governor
Edward Clark

(1815-1880)

Son of a Georgia governor. Came here in 1842. Member Annexation Convention, 1st and 2nd Texas Legislatures. Participant Mexican War. Secretary of State 1853-7. Elected Lieutenant Governor 1859. Made Governor 1861 upon removal of Gov. Sam Houston, who opposed secession. Clark's major activity was mobilizing Texas in cause of Confederacy. Plans were made to prevent federal invasion, take over enemy property, organize resources to provide supplies and arms for defense, and to properly care for families of Texas soldiers battling at the front.
(see other side)
(rear)
Gov. Edward Clark's term from March to November 1861 also faced difficulties caused by mechanics of changing flags, seals, currency, postal and tax systems for membership in new nation. Camps of instruction were set-up over state to enroll, equip and train troops. Hardest job was to convince Texans, the best horsemen in world, that all could not ride in cavalry but some must be foot soldiers in infantry. The C.S.A. was supplied guns, powder, lead, cloth made in penitentiary, salt and 20,000 troops in his term. In late 1861 he raised and became colonel 14th Tex. Inf. Regt. Led units in Arkansas-Louisiana
Governor Edward Clark Marker (<i>back side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
2. Governor Edward Clark Marker (back side)
campaigns to prevent invasion of Texas. Wounded and commended Battle Pleasant Hill April 1864. Discharged 1865. Postwar lawyer, businessman. Buried in Marshall Cemetery.

A memorial to Texans
who served in the Confederacy

 
Erected 1964 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 10143.)
 
Location. 32° 32.699′ N, 94° 22.059′ W. Marker is in Marshall, Texas, in Harrison County. Marker is at the intersection of West Houston Street and South Wellington Street, on the left when traveling east on West Houston Street. Touch for map. Marker is located on the west side of the Harrison County Historical Museum (former Harrison County Courthouse). Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 West Houston Street, Marshall TX 75670, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. General Elkanah Greer / Knights of the Golden Circle (here, next to this marker); James Harper Starr (here, next to this marker); Marshall (a few steps from this marker); Harrison County (a few steps from this marker); Telegraph Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of The Capitol Hotel
Governor Edward Clark Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
3. Governor Edward Clark Marker (wide view)
(about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sam Houston's 1857 Campaign in Marshall (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of Marshall Masonic Female Institute (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Marshall.
 
More about this marker. Marker is weathered pink granite and somewhat difficult to read
 
Also see . . .
1. Edward Clark, Governor of Texas.
In December 1841 Clark had moved to Texas and opened a law practice in Marshall. In July 1849 he married Martha Melissa Evans of Marshall. The couple had four children. Clark was a delegate to the Texas Constitutional Convention of 1845, a member of the first state House of Representatives, and a senator in the Second Legislature. (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Governor by Chance.
Clark was elected lieutenant governor in 1859, when Sam Houston was elected governor. Houston and Clark assumed office just in time to deal with the secession issue. Houston’s whole political career in Texas had worked toward securing statehood for Texas and keeping it in the Union. Clark’s sympathies were more "southern," but Houston decided policy as long as he was governor. Of all the Deep South governors, only Houston refused to call a secession convention after South Carolina began the process on December 20, 1860. When Houston refused to do so, the convention declared the office of governor vacated, and that elevated Clark to the post. He took the required oath of office and went right to work raising troops and money and generally readying Texas for war. (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. War, Ruin, and Reconstruction: Edward Clark.
Accomplishments: The major event of Clark's governorship was the enlistment of 20,000 Texans to fight for the Confederacy. Later years: After being narrowly defeated by Francis Lubbock (he lost by 124 votes), Clark became colonel of the 14th Texas Infantry. He was wounded at Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, and promoted to brigadier general. After a brief exile in Mexico at the end of the war, Clark returned to business and a law practice in Marshall, where he died May 4, 1880. (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. PoliticsWar, Mexican-AmericanWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 6, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 1, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 38 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 1, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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