Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Marshall in Harrison County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

James Harper Starr

 
 
James Harper Starr Marker (<i>front side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
1. James Harper Starr Marker (front side)
Inscription.
(front)
Home Town of Texas Confederate
James Harper Starr
1809 - 1890

Connecticut-born. Came to Texas 1837. A doctor in Nacogdoches. Secretary of the Treasury and Army Surgeon, Republic of Texas. At start of Civil War appointed East Texas Receiver in Sequestration to take and sell the property of enemy aliens, the proceeds going to Treasury of Confederacy to aid the war effort. Became Postmaster General for western C.S.A. in 1864. The South was then spit in two parts by Federal Control of the Mississippi River. Starr's problem was to provide mail service in Louisiana, Arkansas and Texas and to devise means
(see other side)
(rear)
to get mail through the enemy military lines and naval blockade to and from westerners fighting east of the river and the Confederate capital. This was essential to soldier and home front morale and to maintain necessary military and governmental communications. The mail was carried by pony express, wagons, blockade running vessels, stage coach lines, couriers, spies and Army details. Starr competed with the Army to get drivers, wagons and horses. Draft by military of postal employees was fought by writs of habeas corpus. Men under 16 were hired. Printing facilities were limited and forms, supplies, stamps
James Harper Starr Marker (<i>back side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
2. James Harper Starr Marker (back side)
had to be smuggled. The children of a cabinet officer once came through enemy lines with $3,000,000 worth of stamps for him. After the war, Starr in 1865 looked into East Texas oil showings. He founded Marshall's first bank. Starr County was named in his honor.
 
Erected 1964 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 10215.)
 
Location. 32° 32.7′ N, 94° 22.06′ W. Marker is in Marshall, Texas, in Harrison County. Marker is at the intersection of West Houston Street and South Wellington Street, on the left when traveling east on West Houston Street. Touch for map. Marker is on the west side of the Harrison County Historical Museum (former Harrison County Courthouse). Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 West Houston Street, Marshall TX 75670, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. General Elkanah Greer / Knights of the Golden Circle (here, next to this marker); Governor Edward Clark (here, next to this marker); Marshall (a few steps from this marker); Harrison County (a few steps from this marker); Telegraph Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of The Capitol Hotel
James Harper Starr Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
3. James Harper Starr Marker (wide view)
(about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sam Houston's 1857 Campaign in Marshall (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of Marshall Masonic Female Institute (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Marshall.
 
More about this marker. Marker is weathered pink granite and somewhat difficult to read
 
Also see . . .
1. James Harper Starr.
In 1868 Starr formed James H. Starr and Son, a land and banking agency, in Marshall, one of the first banks in Texas. He moved his family to Marshall in 1870. He retired in 1873, and spent the later part of his life at his home in Marshall. He continued to advise clients on Texas land. He was offered appointment as one of the first regents of the University of Texas but declined due to poor health. He died on July 25, 1890, and was buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Marshall. (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. James Harper Starr.
Starr supported annexation to the Union in 1845 but not secession from it fifteen years later, but his sons and son-in-law, Henry Raguet, entered Confederate military service when the Civil War began. He did accept a civil appointment as a receiver for the Confederate government and later as a Confederate postal agent. After the collapse of the Confederacy Starr formed a partnership with his son, James Franklin Starr, in a land speculation and banking enterprise in Marshall, Texas. Starr eventually moved his entire family to Marshall, where he continued in business until his retirement in 1873. (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommercePoliticsWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 1, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 69 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on December 1, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3. submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement