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Jefferson in Marion County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Mergenthaler Linotype Typesetting Machine

Made in the early 1920ís

 
 
Mergenthaler Linotype Typesetting Machine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
1. Mergenthaler Linotype Typesetting Machine Marker
Inscription. This machine was used by the Jefferson Jimplecute to make newspaper printing plates until the early 1970ís. This “hot type” machine actually melted lead that was then cast into strips of lead type that were locked into place on the printing press. After printing, the type was re-melted to begin the process again.

Come into The Jefferson Museum to see many other exhibits.
 
Erected by The Jefferson Museum.
 
Location. 32° 45.349′ N, 94° 20.783′ W. Marker is in Jefferson, Texas, in Marion County. Marker is at the intersection of North Market Street and West Bateman Alley, on the right when traveling north on North Market Street. Touch for map. Marker is located outside the Jefferson Museum, beside the subject machine, at the northwest corner of the property. Marker is at or near this postal address: 223 West Austin Street, Jefferson TX 75657, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Brown-Bender House (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Federal Court and Post Office Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Sterne Fountain (within shouting distance of this marker); Captain William Perry
Mergenthaler Linotype Typesetting Machine Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
2. Mergenthaler Linotype Typesetting Machine Marker (wide view)
(within shouting distance of this marker); Excelsior House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Texas Artificial Gas Plant (about 300 feet away); Jefferson Public Library (about 300 feet away); Jay Gould Railroad Car (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Jefferson.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ottmar Mergenthaler and the Linotype.
Although Ottmar Mergenthaler was born in Hatchel, Germany in 1854 and received his early training as a watchmaker in WŁrttemberg, his creative career started and flourished after he arrived in Washington, D.C. in 1872 at the age of eighteen. Mergenthalerís concept was to produce a machine that did not merely set previously cast type, as the other machines did, but to combine the casting of type with the composition of text in a single operation. By July, 1884 two new machines on this principle were completed. In his own words, “Smoothly and silently the matrices slid into their places, were clamped and aligned, the pump discharged its contents, a finished Linotype, shining like silver, dropped from the machine and the matrices returned to their normal positions.” (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Mergenthaler Linotype Machine image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
3. Mergenthaler Linotype Machine
 

2. The Invention of the Linotype Machine.
Perhaps one of the most notable inventions in the United States print world is the Linotype machine, developed in 1884 by a German watchmaker named Ottmar Mergenthaler. This machine drastically sped up the printing process and helped revolutionize the newspaper industry by its innovative technique of “line casting,” which placed entire lines of type for printing, rather than just individual letter typesetting. The name is a derivation from its full name, “Line of Type,” which is a literal description of the machine, itself. (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Linotype typesetting machine. by which characters are cast in type metal as a complete line rather than as individual characters as on the Monotype typesetting machine. It was patented in the United States in 1884 by Ottmar Mergenthaler. Linotype, which has now largely been supplanted by photocomposition, was most often used when large amounts of straight text matter were to be set. (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. The linotype machine. is a "line casting" machine used in printing sold by the Mergenthaler Linotype Company and related companies. It was a hot metal typesetting
Mergenthaler Linotype Machine image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
4. Mergenthaler Linotype Machine
system that cast blocks of metal type for individual uses. Linotype became one of the mainstay methods to set type, especially small-size body text, for newspapers, magazines and posters from the late 19th century to the 1970s and 1980s (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

5. Jefferson Jimplecute.
The Jimplecute was one of Marion County's most influential publications, and survives today as Texas's fifth oldest newspaper. It was published by Taylor and Taylor as the Jimplecute from 1900 to 1907, then under the name of the Jefferson Jimplecute from 1907 to 1926. The weekly served primarily the town of Jefferson, but it also circulated throughout northeast Texas and occasionally addressed its contents to nearby communities such as Lockett. The paper's curious name can be traced to two possible sources: 1) a colloquial expression meaning "sweetheart"Ě or 2) a strange mythical creature composed of elements of a dragon, an Indian, an armadillo, and a lion. (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. CommunicationsIndustry & Commerce
 
Mergenthaler Linotype Machine image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
5. Mergenthaler Linotype Machine
Jefferson Museum (<i>Sponsor of Linotype Machine exhibit</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
6. Jefferson Museum (Sponsor of Linotype Machine exhibit)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 10, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 4, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 52 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on December 4, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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