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Center in Shelby County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Shelby County

 
 
Shelby County Marker (<i>detail view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 25, 2014
1. Shelby County Marker (detail view)
Inscription. Part of the neutral ground, 1803–1819. Settled by Anglo-Americans, 1824–1836. In 1833 a district of the Municipality of Nacogdoches, known as Tenehaw. In 1835 became municipality of Tenehaw with Nashville as the seat of government.

Name changed to Shelby in 1836 in honor of Isaac Shelby, 1750–1826, a gallant officer in the Continental Army Revolutionary War.

Created a county March 17, 1836. Organized in 1837 with county seat at Shelbyville. Moved to Center in 1866.
In Memory Of

William English, Frederick Poye, George Butler, John M. Bradley, Jonas Harrison, delegates to the First Convention of Texas, 1832, from the District of Tenehaw.

Martin Parmer delegate to the Consultation from the Municipality of Tenehaw.

Sydney O. Bennington, William O. Crawford, signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence from Shelby Municipality.

The soldiers from Shelby County who fought at San Jacinto and elsewhere for and in defense of the Republic of Texas.

In this county was waged the Regulator-Moderator Feud, 1841–1844. During this time the warring factions fought several drawn battles, entailing loss of life and property. Troops of the Republic of Texas commanded by General James Smith finally restored order.
 
Erected
Shelby County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 25, 2014
2. Shelby County Marker
1936 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 7694.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments marker series.
 
Location. 31° 47.689′ N, 94° 10.892′ W. Marker is in Center, Texas, in Shelby County. Marker is at the intersection of Austin Street and Runnels Street, on the left when traveling east on Austin Street. Touch for map. Marker is located on the south side of the Shelby County Courthouse. Marker is at or near this postal address: 124 Austin Street, Center TX 75935, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. C.S.A. Texas Muster (within shouting distance of this marker); John Joseph Emmett Gibson (within shouting distance of this marker); Shelby County Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Poultry Pioneers Plaza (approx. 1.1 miles away); Martin McCoy Middleton (approx. 1.1 miles away); Malcolm S. Weaver (approx. 1.1 miles away); Martin Weaver (approx. 1.1 miles away); John O. Moosberg (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Center.
 
Also see . . .
1. Brief History of Shelby County. One of the original counties of Texas was organized in 1837. It was named for Isaac Shelby, a Revolutionary soldier from Kentucky. Counties in nine other states are also named after Isaac Shelby.
Shelby County Marker (<i>wide view - Shelby County Courthouse in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 25, 2014
3. Shelby County Marker (wide view - Shelby County Courthouse in background)
Shelbyville, created in 1824, was once called Nashville. Its name was changed to Shelbyville when it became the county seat. Center, the area once called White Cottage, later became the county seat in 1866. J.J.E. Gibson, a native of Ireland, built the Shelby County Courthouse in 1883-85. This courthouse is today one of the five oldest courthouses in Texas of the original design. The Shelby County courthouse is the only Irish castle style courthouse remaining in the United States. Two Shelby County natives, Sydney O. Penington and William Crawford, were signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence. (Submitted on December 4, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Shelby County. is on the eastern boundary of the state, in a bulge of the Sabine River that separates it from Desoto and Sabine parishes in Louisiana. The county is bounded on the south by San Augustine and Sabine counties, on the west by Rusk and Nacogdoches counties, and on the north by Panola County. The county seat and largest town is Center, which is 160 miles northeast of Houston and forty miles northeast of Nacogdoches. (Submitted on December 4, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. The Regulator-Moderator War. was a feud in Harrison and Shelby counties in the Redlands of East Texas from 1839 to 1844. The principal leaders of the Regulators were Charles W. Jackson and Charles W. Moorman, and the principal leaders of the Moderators were Edward Merchant, John M. Bradley, and Deputy Sheriff James J. Cravens. The roots of the conflict lay in the frauds and land swindling that had been rife in the Neutral Ground, the lawless area between the American and Mexican borders. (Submitted on December 4, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismSettlements & SettlersWar, Texas IndependenceWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 6, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 4, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 64 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 4, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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