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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Meridian in Lauderdale County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

First Union Missionary Baptist Church

Meridian Civil Rights Trail

 
 
First Union Missionary Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, December 3, 2017
1. First Union Missionary Baptist Church Marker
Inscription. Founded in 1891, First Union Missionary Baptist Church served as a meeting place for numerous Civil Rights activities. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., spoke here during the Freedom Summer of 1964. Weeks later, First Union was the site of activist James Chaney's funeral.
 
Erected 2014 by the Meridian/Lauderdale County Tourism Bureau. (Marker Number 17.)
 
Location. 32° 21.768′ N, 88° 42.938′ W. Marker is in Meridian, Mississippi, in Lauderdale County. Marker is on 38th Avenue north of Davis Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 610 38th Avenue, Meridian MS 39307, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Charles W. "Savez" Read (approx. 0.2 miles away); Rose Hill Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lt. Charles Read (approx. 0.2 miles away); Merrehope (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Merrehope (approx. 0.4 miles away); Council of Organizations (approx. half a mile away); Dial House Site (approx. half a mile away); Old Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist Church (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Meridian.
 
Also see . . .
1. 'Visit Meridian' page on the First Union Missionary Baptist Church.
First Union Missionary Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, December 3, 2017
2. First Union Missionary Baptist Church
(Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
2. Wikipedia article on Freedom Summer of 1964. (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches & ReligionCivil Rights
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 5, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 5, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 62 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 5, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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