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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Caldwell in Burleson County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Cooks Point

 
 
Cooks Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 26, 2014
1. Cooks Point Marker
Inscription.
Founded about 1840 where colonial road from southeast crossed San Antonio Road. Settler Gabriel Jackson had two-story log cabin-trading post here. Community was named for Silas L. Cooke, who surveyed much land in this vicinity. It is now a thriving rural village.
 
Erected 1969 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 7566.)
 
Location. 30° 35.769′ N, 96° 36.631′ W. Marker is near Caldwell, Texas, in Burleson County. Marker is at the intersection of Presidential Corridor E (State Highway 21) and County Road 216, on the right when traveling west on Presidential Corridor E. Touch for map. Marker is located in a pull-out in front of the Cooks Point Bretheren Church. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6945 TX-21, Caldwell TX 77836, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Kings Highway (here, next to this marker); Near Homesite of Judge Andrew S. Broaddus (here, next to this marker); Moseley's Ferry (approx. 4.4 miles away); John Mitchell (approx. 6.6 miles away); Burleson County (approx. 6.6 miles away);
Cooks Point Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 26, 2014
2. Cooks Point Marker (tall view)
City of Caldwell (approx. 6.6 miles away); Early Settlers of Burleson County in the Texas War for Independence (approx. 6.6 miles away); Burleson County in World War II (approx. 6.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Caldwell.
 
Also see . . .
1. Cooks Point.
Cooks Point is one of the oldest communities in the county. The community began as a crossroads settlement at the point where the old Colonial Road from Washington-on-the-Brazos and Independence to Tenoxtitlan and Nashville crossed the Old San Antonio Road. The first recorded trading post in the area was that of Gabriel Jackson, who built a two-story log house nearby and operated a store on the first floor. In 1854 Judge A. S. Broaddus led a wagon train, stretching over a mile long, of eighty whites and 120 blacks from Virginia to Cooks Point. (Submitted on December 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Silas Lechmere Cooke.
By 1837, Silas L Cooke was making his own way in Texas. In the spring of 1837 he was with settlers who took refuge at Fort Oldham in Burleson County. A short time later, Silas is listed with a group who went in pursuit of Indians engaged them at Battle Ground Prairie. In the 1850 census, Silas (Occupation Surveyor)
Cooks Point Marker (<i>wide view showing adjacent markers</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 26, 2014
3. Cooks Point Marker (wide view showing adjacent markers)
is living in Burleson, Texas at age 25. (Submitted on December 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Roads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 7, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 55 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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