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Bandera in Bandera County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Camp Montel C.S.A. / Texas Civil War Frontier Defense

 
 
Camp Montel C.S.A. / Texas Civil War Frontier Defense Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 28, 2014
1. Camp Montel C.S.A. / Texas Civil War Frontier Defense Marker
Inscription.
(side 1)
Camp Montel C.S.A.

Site 25 mi. West on Hy. 470, 1 mi. South. Established 1862 as part of Red River-Rio Grande defense line. Named for Captain Charles DeMontel, surveyor and colonizer of Bandera, leader of county defenses. Occupied by troops of Texas frontier regiment who furnished their own guns and mounts but often lacked food, clothing, supplies. In 1860 Bandera County's population was 399. Although all the men were needed to defend the county from Indians, many joined the Confederate and State troops. Some went to protect the Texas Coast from Union invasion. Many were assigned to defend the frontier in this region. Scouting parties and patrols managed to effectively curb Indian raids until war's end.

(side 2)
Texas Civil War Frontier Defense

Texas had 2,000 miles of coastline and frontier to defend from Union attack; Indian raids, marauders, bandits from Mexico & Defense lines were set to give maximum protection with the few men left in the State. One line stretched from El Paso to Brownsville. Another, including Camp Montel, had stations a day's horseback ride apart from Red River to Rio Grande. Former U.S. forts used by scouting parties lay in a line between & behind these lines and to the east organized militia, citizens' posses from settlements
Camp Montel C.S.A. / Texas Civil War Frontier Defense Marker Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 28, 2014
2. Camp Montel C.S.A. / Texas Civil War Frontier Defense Marker Marker (wide view)
backed the Confederate and State troops.
A memorial to Texans
who served the Confederacy

 
Erected 1964 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 668.)
 
Location. 29° 43.584′ N, 99° 4.364′ W. Marker is in Bandera, Texas, in Bandera County. Marker is on Main Street (State Highway 173) north of Hackberry Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in front of the Bandera County Courthouse. Marker is at or near this postal address: 504 Main Street, Bandera TX 78003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bandera County Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Huffmeyer Store (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bandera Pass (approx. 9.4 miles away); One Mile to Ruins of Camp Verde (approx. 11.7 miles away); Penateka Comanches (approx. 11.7 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large, pink granite slab. It is significantly weathered and somewhat difficult to read
 
Also see . . .  Camp Montel. Camp Montel, at the head of Seco Creek in Bandera County, was established by James M. Norris in March 1862 as a ranger station for the Frontier Regiment. At this site the town of Montell was later established.
Bandera County Courthouse (<i>view east from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 28, 2014
3. Bandera County Courthouse (view east from marker)
In 1880 and 1881 Company G of the First Texas Volunteer Cavalry was organized and named the Montell Guards. The company, consisting of thirty-seven men and an ordnance store, was stationed at Montell. (Submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 10, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 61 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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