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Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

74th Pennsylvania Infantry

1st Brigade, 3rd Division

 

11th Corps

 
74th Pennsylvania Infantry Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 28, 2008
1. 74th Pennsylvania Infantry Monument
The statue depicts the fallen color bearer of the Regiment. In 2003 the monument was damaged by a car, but has been repaired.
Inscription. (Front):
74th Penna Infantry
German Regiment
1st Brig. 3d Div. 11th Corps.

July 1st fought here from 2 p.m. until the Corps fell back.
July 2 & 3 in line with Division in front of cemetery.

(Back):
Recruited at Pittsburgh and Philadelphia
Mustered in September 14, 1861.
Re-enlisted January 1864
Mustered out August 29, 1865.
Present at Gettysburg 381.
Killed - Officers 2 Men 8.
Wounded - Officers 4 Men 36.
Captured or Missing - Officers 2 Men 58.
Total - Officers 3 Men 102.

 
Erected 1888 by Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
 
Location. 39° 50.472′ N, 77° 14.052′ W. Marker is in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Howard Avenue 0.2 miles east of Mummasburg Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Third Division (within shouting distance of this marker); 61st Ohio Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 45th New York Infantry (within shouting distance of this
Back of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 28, 2008
2. Back of Monument
marker); First Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); Battery I, First Ohio Light Artillery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Artillery Brigade (about 400 feet away); Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association (about 400 feet away); 13th New York Independent Light Battery (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. 74th Pennsylvania Infantry. Page detailing the history of the regiment. The 74th was among many "German" regiments raised from immigrants, chiefly those fleeing the aftermath from the Revolutions of 1848. (Submitted on September 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Damage to the Monument. Photos and details of both the damage to the monument and subsequent repairs. (Submitted on September 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Regimental Command
At Gettysburg, command of the Regiment went through several evolutions. Marching into battle, the 74th was commanded by Colonel Adolph Von Hartung. When
74th Pennsylvania Infantry image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 28, 2008
3. 74th Pennsylvania Infantry
Initially the regiment was posted near the Carlisle Road in skirmish order, but then redeployed in this vicinity. The two white flank marker stones (foreground and just beyond the monument) indicate the frontage of the regiment during the later afternoon phases of the July 1 battle.
he was wounded, Lt. Col. Theobald Von Mitzel assumed command, but he was captured in the retreat. Captain Henry Krauseneck was then the ranking officer, commanding the remainder of the regiment. But Captain Krauseneck was later cited for cowardice and forced to resign in January 1864.
    — Submitted September 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Regiment's Position on July 2 and 3 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
4. Regiment's Position on July 2 and 3
In the National Cemetery is a left flank marker stone for the 74th Pennsylvania, seen here to the right of frame near the road. (The right flank stone presumably removed or covered by the trees). This represents the 74th's position on July 2 and 3.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,059 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on March 22, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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