Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
City of Westminster in Greater London County, England, United Kingdom
 

Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding

 
 
Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 15, 2017
1. Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding Marker
Inscription. Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding was Commander-in-Chief of Fighter Command, Royal Air Force, from its formation in 1936 until November 1940. He was thus responsible for the preparation for and the conduct of the Battle of Britain.

With remarkable foresight, he ensured the equipment of his command with monoplane fighters, the Hurricane and the Spitfire. He was among the first to appreciate the vital importance of R.D.F. (radar) and of an effective command and control system for his squadrons. They were ready when war came.

In the preliminary stages of that war, he thoroughly trained his minimal forces and conserved them against strong political pressures to disperse and misuse them. His wise and prudent judgement and leadership helped to ensure victory against overwhelming odds and thus prevented the loss of the Battle of Britain and probably the whole war.

To him, the people of Britain and of the free world owe largely the way life and the liberties they enjoy today.
 
Erected 1988.
 
Location. 51° 30.778′ N, 0° 6.855′ W. Marker is in City of Westminster, England, in Greater London County. Marker is at the intersection of Strand and Aldwych, on the right when traveling west on Strand. Touch for map

Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding Memorial and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 15, 2017
2. Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding Memorial and Marker
The plinth is inscribed: Air Chief Marshal/ Lord Dowding/ GCB, GCVO,CMG, RAF/ Baron of Bentley Priory/in/the County of Middlesex/Comander-in-Chief/ Fighter Command/ Royal Air Force/1936-1940
. Marker is in this post office area: City of Westminster, England WC2R 1DH, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The George (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); The Edgar Wallace (about 90 meters away); The Imperial Society of Knights Bachelor (about 150 meters away); Bush House (about 210 meters away); W.H. Smith & Son - Bomb Damage (about 240 meters away); The Automobile Association (approx. 0.2 kilometers away); Ivor Novello (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Johnson's Court (approx. 0.4 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of Westminster.
 
More about this marker. The memorial was unveiled on October 30, 1988, and was sculpted by Faith Winter. The memorial stands on the west side of St. Clement Danes, the Central Church of the Royal Air Force.
 
Also see . . .
1. Hugh Dowding (Wikipedia). "Air Chief Marshal Hugh Caswall Tremenheere Dowding, 1st Baron Dowding, GCB, GCVO, CMG (24 April 1882 – 15 February 1970) was an officer in the Royal Air Force. He served as a fighter pilot and then as commanding officer of No. 16 Squadron during the First World War. During the inter-war years he became Air Officer Commanding Fighting Area,
Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding Memorial - Closeup image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 15, 2017
3. Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding Memorial - Closeup
Air Defence of Great Britain and then joined the Air Council as Air Member for Supply and Research. He was Air Officer Commanding RAF Fighter Command during the Battle of Britain, and is generally credited with playing a crucial role in Britain's defence, and hence, the defeat of Adolf Hitler's plan to invade Britain. He was unwillingly replaced in command in November 1940 by Big Wing advocate Sholto Douglas." (Submitted on December 12, 2017.) 

2. Battle of Britain (Wikipedia). "The Battle of Britain (German: Luftschlacht um England, literally "the air battle for England") was a military campaign of the Second World War, in which the Royal Air Force (RAF) defended the United Kingdom (UK) against large-scale attacks by the German Air Force (Luftwaffe). It has been described as the first major military campaign fought entirely by air forces....The British officially recognise the battle's duration as being from 10 July until 31 October 1940, which overlaps the period of large-scale night attacks known as the Blitz, that lasted from 7 September 1940 to 11 May 1941. German historians do not accept this subdivision and regard the battle as a single campaign lasting from July 1940 to June 1941, including the Blitz." (Submitted on December 12, 2017.) 
 
Categories. War, World II
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 12, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 12, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 56 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 12, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
Paid Advertisement