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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
The National Mall in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Moon

 
 
Moon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 12, 2017
1. Moon Marker
Inscription.
The Moon is Earth's only natural satellite. How did the Moon form? Scientists think it formed when a planetary object the size of Mars collided with Earth about 4.5 billion years ago. The Moon is covered with impact craters that formed when asteroids and comets crashed into its surface. The roughly circular dark regions called maria (Latin for "seas") are vast impact craters that filled with lava. The light-colored lunar highlands are heavily cratered. The combined gravity of the Moon and Sun cause Earth's ocean tides.

Captions:
Inside the Observatory
The moon is often featured during the Public Observatory's daytime and nighttime observing hours. Through our telescopes you can see lunar craters, mountains, and maria.

Viewing Our Solar System:
Center for Earth Planetary Studies

The Center for Earth and Planetary Studies (CEPS) is the National Air and Space Museum's planetary science research unit. CEPS scientists use radar systems on Earth and aboard spacecraft to study buried features on the Moon, map the surface of cloud-covered Venus, and probe the polar ice caps and volcanic deposits of Mars.

The Moon as seen from a Tele Vue-85 telescope at the Public Observatory on March 1, 2012.

CEPS scientists created this image of the Moon's Mare Imbrium
Moon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 12, 2017
2. Moon Marker
and Mare Serenitatis using radar data. The image reveals buried volcanic features invisible in surface images.
Bruce Campbell & Gareth Morgan, Smithsonian Institution; NASA; background, LOLA Team

This close-up view of the crater Aristarchus shows details of the crater wall and central peak. The image was taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.
NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

Caption of main image:
←This view of the Moon was created using data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.
NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

How to Learn More:
Visit CEPS at http://airandspace.si.edu/research/cfps
 
Erected by National Air and Space Museum.
 
Location. 38° 53.273′ N, 77° 1.112′ W. Marker is in The National Mall, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Independence Avenue Southwest west of 4th Street SW, on the right. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20024, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Venus (here, next to this marker); Phoebe Waterman Haas (here, next to this marker); Saturn (here, next to this marker); Jupiter (here, next to this marker); Sun (here, next to this marker); Cook Telescope (here, next to this marker); Binary Stars (here, next to this marker); Star Nurseries (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in The National Mall.
 
More about this marker. On the grounds of the National Air and Space Museum on the side of the Phoebe Waterman Haas Public Observatory.
 
Categories. Air & Space
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 15, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 12, 2017, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 47 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 12, 2017, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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