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Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Conservation Geography

 
 
First panel from the left image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
1. First panel from the left
Inscription.
Conservation Geography

First panel from the left:
The Terai Arc:
A Haven for Wildlife

The Terai stretches 620 miles along the border of Nepal and India.


Tucked into the foothills of the Himalayas, the Terai Arc was once an ideal home for many endangered animals—Bengal tigers, greater one-horned Asian rhinoceroses, Asian elephants and sloth bears.

But as more people moved into the region, the space for animals shrank to small patches.

Touch here to see the boundaries of the Terai Arc.

Caption on image:
Photo by: Jessie Cohen, NZP

Second panel from the left:
Protected Areas in the Terai Arc

There are 12 protected wildlife parks across the Terai Arc.


Among the dozen protected reserves are two UN World heritage sites: Nepal's Royal Chitwan Park and India's Corbett National Park.

The parks are home to 86 mammal species, 550 bird species, 47 reptile species, and amphibious species, 126 fish species and more than 2,100 flowering plant species.

Touch here to see the Terai's protected parks.

Caption on image:
Photo by: David Behrens, August 2002.

Third panel from the left:
Terai's
Second panel from the left image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
2. Second panel from the left
Tigers

In 2004, there were more than 250 Bengal tigers in the Terai Arc.


Terai's tigers represent one of the world's highest-density populations. But they also live in some of the smallest-known territories, isolated by large farming tracts.

Community efforts to re-plant and patrol the forests at the edge of the nature reserves have begun to restore the habitat and brighten the future for Terai's tigers.

Touch here to see where tigers live in the Terai Arc.

Caption on image:
Special thanks to Mahendra Shrestha of the Save the Tiger Fund for his Terai Arc map research.

Fourth panel from the left:
Sloth Bears of the Terai

Scientists believe that fewer than 500 sloth bears live in the region.


From the early 1960s to the early 1980s, the number of people living in the Terai nearly tripled, and about half the forest was converted to agriculture.

Today, sloth bears live in isolated patches of forest, and are more prevalent in the eastern part of the region.

Touch here to see where sloth bears live in the Terai Arc.

Caption from image:
Photograph: K. Yuganand

Fifth panel from the left:
Connecting the Reserves

Degraded habitat prevents animals from moving between green zones.


If
Third panel from the left image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
3. Third panel from the left
the Terai Arc's endangered animals are to survive they must be able to migrate between the area's 12 parks.

Conservationists are working to connect the patches of national forests with a series of "wildlife corridors," protected wilderness areas that allow the animals to travel safely from park to park.

Touch here to see the planned corridors between the parks.

Sixth panel from the left:
Relocating Rhinos

To bridge the gaps between parks, wild rhinos get a lift!

Nepali biologists have moved rhinoceroses from Nepal's Royal Chitwan National Park, where they are plentiful, to Royal Bardia National Park, where poachers have eliminated the population.

The rhinos ride 15 hours in the backs of trucks to their new home more than 300 miles away!

Touch here to follow the rhinos' long drive.
 
Erected by Smithsonian Institution.
 
Location. 38° 55.806′ N, 77° 3.236′ W. Marker is in Smithsonian National Zoo, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Olmstead Walk. Touch for map. On the grounds of the Smithsonian National Zoological Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3001 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington DC 20008, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other
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By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
4. Fourth panel from left
markers are within walking distance of this marker. Saving Species Through Science (within shouting distance of this marker); Black and Gray Squirrels (within shouting distance of this marker); Olmsted Walk (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Redwood (about 400 feet away); Bison and the National Zoo (about 700 feet away); And Then There Were (Almost) None (about 700 feet away); Meet Our Bison (about 800 feet away); Feeding Times at the Zoo (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Smithsonian National Zoo.
 
Categories. AnimalsEnvironment
 
Fifth and sixth panels from the left image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
5. Fifth and sixth panels from the left
Conservation Geography Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
6. Conservation Geography Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 17, 2017, by Devry Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 50 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 17, 2017, by Devry Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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