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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The O-Line

Smithsonian's National Zoo

 

125 Years

 
The O-Line Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
1. The O-Line Marker
Inscription.
In 1995, the Zoo debuted the O-Line, a series of towers and vine-like cables. It allows our orangutans to travel between the Great Ape House and Think Tank, if they choose to do so. Still innovative today, the O-Line is the only "orangutan transport system" of its kind.

Captions from images on marker:
Orangutans are tree-dwellers and experts on the O-Line.

The best time to see our orangutans on the O-Line is on warm days from 11-11:30am.

This exhibition has been brought to you in part by:
Giant
 
Erected by Smithsonian Institution.
 
Location. 38° 55.764′ N, 77° 2.875′ W. Marker is in Smithsonian National Zoo, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Olmsted Walk. Touch for map. On the grounds of the Smithsonian National Zoological Garden. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20008, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (within shouting distance of this marker); Aldabra Tortoise (within shouting distance of this marker); The Book That Brought a Dinosaur to Life (within shouting distance of this marker); A Hollywood Legend at the Zoo?
The O-Line Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
2. The O-Line Marker
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); How to Drink Coffee and Save Birds (about 300 feet away); Prairie Dogs (about 400 feet away); A Capital Bird (about 500 feet away); Easter Monday (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Smithsonian National Zoo.
 
Categories. AnimalsArchitectureCharity & Public Work
 
Orangutan using the O-Line on December 17, 2017 image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
3. Orangutan using the O-Line on December 17, 2017
Orangutan using the O-Line on December 17, 2017 image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
4. Orangutan using the O-Line on December 17, 2017
The O-Line image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
5. The O-Line

The O-Line

What's the O-Line?
It's our orangutan transit system. Vine-like cables, linked to towers, connect Great Ape House and Think Tank. The orangutans can choose to leave one house and walk or swing along the "vines" to the other house. The O-Line lets our apes travel and spend time up high, just as they would in the wild.

Won't the apes fall?
No. Orangutans are experts at moving safely amid forest canopies, whether walking or swinging. Swinging apes will brachiate (bray-kee-ate). Their shoulders rotate at each swing as they grasp branches, moving arm over arm to breeze through the trees.
Sign below the O-Line image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
6. Sign below the O-Line

Orang
Xing
Nearly identical sign elsewhere in the Zoo, with different photos and captions image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
7. Nearly identical sign elsewhere in the Zoo, with different photos and captions

Captions of photos on marker:
The best time to see our orangutans on the O-Line is on warm days from 11-11:30 am.

Orangutans test a section of cables on the O-line before all towers are connected, 1994.

This exhibition has been brought to you in part by:

abc 7
on your side
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 28, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 17, 2017, by Devry Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 64 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 17, 2017, by Devry Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7. submitted on December 20, 2017, by Devry Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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