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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Foggy Bottom in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Marshall

1755 - 1835

 
 
John Marshall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones
1. John Marshall Marker
Inscription.

Here lived for a time
John Marshall
1755 - 1835


Officer in the Revolutionary War 1775 - 1781
Envoy to France 1797 - 1798
Secretary of War - 1800
Secretary of State - 1800
Chief Justice of the United States 1801 - 1835

Placed by the
District of Columbia Daughters
of
The American Revolution

1930

This house
was built and
occupied by
Tench Ringgold

 
Erected 1930 by District of Columbia Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 38° 53.85′ N, 77° 2.518′ W. Marker is in Foggy Bottom, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on F Street Northwest east of 19th Street NW. Touch for map. On the grounds of the Dacor Bacon House. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1801 F St NW, Washington DC 20006, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1801 F Street (here, next to this marker); Peace at Last! (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Octagon (about 400 feet away);
John Marshall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 20, 2017
2. John Marshall Marker
a different marker also named The Octagon (about 500 feet away); Gen. John A. Rawlins Memorial (about 700 feet away); Winder Building (about 700 feet away); The IMF (about 700 feet away); Alexander Ray House (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Foggy Bottom.
 
Categories. PoliticsWar, US Revolutionary
 
John Marshall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 20, 2017
3. John Marshall Marker
John Marshall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 20, 2017
4. John Marshall Marker
John Marshall image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 18, 2014
5. John Marshall
This 1809–10 portrait of John Marshall by Cephus Thompson hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“John Marshall, the fourth chief justice of the United States, established the concept of judicial review — in which the Supreme Court could pronounce a law of Congress as unconstitutional — and strengthened the idea of an independent federal judiciary. In cases brought to the Court between 1810 and 1824 — years in which the Marshall Court enjoyed great stability and harmony — Marshall used the Court's judicial review to nullify state laws violating constitutional restraints of state power. The effect of Marshall's long tenure as chief justice (1801-35) was to strengthen the Court, the Constitution, and the federal government. The Court became a preeminent interpreter of the Constitution, and the federal government's enumerated powers were given a broad interpretation and made superior to those of the states.

Cephas Thompson painted a portrait of Marshall from life in Richmond, as well as six replicas for admirers, two years after Marshall presided at the trial of Aaron Burr for treason.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 19, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 20, 2017, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 117 times since then and 53 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 20, 2017, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   5. submitted on June 18, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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