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Anderson in Grimes County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

In Memory of Jesse Grimes and Mathew Caldwell

Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence

 

—March 2, 1836 —

 
In Memory of Jesse Grimes and Mathew Caldwell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 4, 2013
1. In Memory of Jesse Grimes and Mathew Caldwell Marker
Inscription.
Mathew Caldwell was called Paul Revere of the Texas Revolution. Caldwell’s daughters Lucy Ann and Martha Elizabeth came to Grimes County from Gonzales. Martha E. Married Isham Dixon Davis and settled N. Grimes County at Mesa, near Iola, by 1846. Raised a family of 13 children in the house that is now a historic landmark. Many descendants still reside in Grimes Co. today.
 
Erected 1986 by Grimes County Sesquicentennial Commission & Carl Chaney, a great-great grandson of M. E. Caldwell.
 
Location. 30° 29.324′ N, 95° 59.204′ W. Marker is in Anderson, Texas, in Grimes County. Marker is at the intersection of South Main Street (State Highway 429) and Buffington Lane, on the left when traveling north on South Main Street. Touch for map. Located near southeast corner of the Grimes County Courthouse. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 South Main Street, Anderson TX 77830, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Veterans Memorial (here, next to this marker); Grimes County Courthouse (a few steps from this marker); Grimes County (a few steps from this marker); Grimes County, C.S.A.
In Memory of Jesse Grimes and Mathew Caldwell Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 4, 2013
2. In Memory of Jesse Grimes and Mathew Caldwell Marker (tall view)
(within shouting distance of this marker); Rocky Creek Bridge (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); La Bahia Road (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fanthorp Inn (approx. 0.4 miles away); Michael Moore Kennard (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anderson.
 
Also see . . .
1. Mathew Caldwell. has been called "the Paul Revere of the Texas Revolution" because he rode from Gonzales to Bastrop to call men to arms before the battle of Gonzales in October 1835; he was also called "Old Paint" because his whiskers were spotted. Caldwell served as one of the two delegates from Gonzales Municipality at the Convention of 1836 at Washington-on-the-Brazos. On March 2, 1836, after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, the convention dispatched couriers with the news and sent Caldwell with one of the couriers to the Texas army in order to ascertain the condition of the force and the movements of the enemy on the frontier. (Submitted on December 25, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Mathew Caldwell. Caldwell was born on 8 Mar 1798, moved with his parents to Missouri in 1818, became
In Memory of Jesse Grimes and Mathew Caldwell Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 4, 2013
3. In Memory of Jesse Grimes and Mathew Caldwell Marker (wide view)
a skilled Indian fighter in Missouri and was involved in trading with local Indians in the territory. Dixon further states he came to Texas from Missouri via Natchitoches by horseback in 1833 and first settled in current Sabine County where he was elected along with Stephen Blount and Martin Parmer to represent the area at the Independence Convention of 1836. (Submitted on December 25, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Jesse Grimes. Grimes moved to Texas in 1826 and settled temporarily in Stephen F. Austin's second colony on the San Jacinto River in what is now Harris County; in the fall of 1827 he settled on Grimes Prairie, now in Grimes County. On March 21, 1829, he was elected first lieutenant of the First Company, Battalion of Austin. He was elected síndico procurador of the Viesca precinct in December 1830 and in December 1831 was elected a regidor of the ayuntamiento. On October 5, 1832, he was put on a subcommittee of safety and vigilance for the Viesca District and on October 6 was appointed treasurer of the district. He represented Washington Municipality in the Consultation and on November 14, 1835, was elected a member of the General Council of the provisional government. (Submitted on December 25, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Jesse Grimes. represented Washington County in the Senate of the First Congress of the Republic of Texas from October 3, 1836, to September 25, 1837. From November 1, 1841, to December 8, 1843, he represented Montgomery County in the Sixth and Seventh congresses. He filled out Robert M. Williamson's unexpired term in the Eighth Congress, representing Washington, Montgomery, and Brazos counties, and was elected to the Ninth Congress, which ended on June 28, 1845. After annexation he was a member of the Senate of the First, Second, Third, and Fourth legislatures. Grimes County was probably named for him. (Submitted on December 25, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Notable PersonsSettlements & SettlersWar, Texas Independence
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 26, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 25, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 98 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 25, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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