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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arrington in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Wilson Creek Primitive Baptist Church

 
 
Wilson Creek Primitive Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karen Emerson-McPeak, April 23, 2015
1. Wilson Creek Primitive Baptist Church Marker
Inscription. This church was organized on October 13, 1804 with forty-six members including fourteen African-Americans. Early families to worship here were Clayton, Davis, Fleming, Hill, Hyde, Jordon, McKnight, McFadden, and Pate. The site was donated by John D. Hill, the congregation’s first clerk. The brick church, which is the oldest meeting house in the county, was built in 1816. Elder Garner McConnico (1771-1833) served as the first minister. During the Civil War the building was used as a barracks by Union troops. The names of soldiers and their regiments were inscribed on pews and columns.
 
Erected by Williamson County Historical Society.
 
Location. 35° 51.521′ N, 86° 39.507′ W. Marker is in Arrington, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker is on Nolensville Rd near TN Hwy 96, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7940 Nolensville Rd, Arrington TN 37014, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Triune United Methodist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Triune (approx. 0.2 miles away); Triune Cemetery (approx. 0.4 miles away); Bostick Female Academy (approx. 0.4 miles away); Kings’ Chapel Cemetery / Major William Edmondson (approx. 1.7 miles away); Newton Cannon (approx. 2.9 miles away); Arrington (approx. 3.3 miles away); Rock Hill (approx. 4.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Arrington.
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 31, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 31, 2017, by Karen Emerson-McPeak of Triune, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 66 times since then and 33 times this year. Photo   1. submitted on December 31, 2017, by Karen Emerson-McPeak of Triune, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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