Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baton Rouge in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

18th Century Style Sugar House

 
 
18th Century Style Sugar House Marker image. Click for full size.
December 28, 2017
1. 18th Century Style Sugar House Marker
Inscription.
This building is a representation of a small eighteenth century sugar house employing the open-kettle process developed in the West Indies. It was built to show the style of old sugar houses pre-1820 when they were replaced by sugar factories.

This production method utilized a group of iron kettles, usually four to seven arranged in a row from largest to smallest, set into a brick furnace. The row is sometimes referred to as a "Jamaica Train." The furnace's arched flue allowed the heat from the fire, built at the open end, to pass across the bottoms of the kettles and heat their contents before rising out of the chimney.

The least amount of heat was required to heat the raw juice in the largest kettle, la grande, while the greatest concentration of heat was needed for the syrup in the smallest kettle, la batterie.

Caption: Sugar house as viewed from mid-quarters
 
Erected by LSU Rural Life Museum. (Marker Number 12.)
 
Location. 30° 24.639′ N, 91° 6.884′ W. Marker is in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in East Baton Rouge Parish. Marker can be reached from Essen Lane (State Road 3064) south of Interstate 10, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located on the grounds of the

18th Century Style Sugar House Marker image. Click for full size.
December 28, 2017
2. 18th Century Style Sugar House Marker
LSU Rural Life Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4560 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge LA 70808, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Tyrone Slave Cabin (a few steps from this marker); Cane Grinder (a few steps from this marker); Single Pen Slave Cabin (a few steps from this marker); Single-Pen Slave Cabin (a few steps from this marker); Split-Cypress Barn (within shouting distance of this marker); Blacksmith Shop (within shouting distance of this marker); Double-Pen Slave Cabin (within shouting distance of this marker); Oak Ridge, Louisiana Jail (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baton Rouge.
 
Also see . . .  LSU Rural Life Museum. (Submitted on December 31, 2017, by Cajun Scrambler of Assumption, Louisiana.)
 
Categories. AgricultureIndustry & Commerce
 
18th Century Style Sugar House Marker image. Click for full size.
December 28, 2017
3. 18th Century Style Sugar House Marker
La Grande image. Click for full size.
December 28, 2017
4. La Grande
The raw cane juice was first placed in the largest kettle, la grande, where slacked lime was mixed in to serve as a flux for releasing impurities. As the liquid heated up the foreign particles rose and were removed with copper skimmers into a wooden trough. Following a brief period of heating la grande's contents were ladled into la flambeau.
La Flambeau image. Click for full size.
By Cajun Scrambler, December 28, 2017
5. La Flambeau
Here, and in la sirop, the juice continued to boil all the while creating more scum which was skimmed off. As the juice cooked, it thickened and fewer impurities were released. Finally the syrup was ready to be ladled in to la batterie.
La Batterie image. Click for full size.
December 28, 2017
6. La Batterie
The last step of the cooking process occured in la batterie. The fire was built under this kettle since it required the greatest concentration of heat. The syrup was boiled to the proper consistency needed for crystallization at which time the batch was ready for "striking", or removing the contents and placing it into the cooling vats. Throughout the cooling process the syrup continued to granulate, Completely cooled, the raw sugary material called massecuite was transferred from the vats into large barrels for the final purging of molasses. The portion that drained off was usually left as molasses. What remained in the large barrels were brown crystals, or raw sugar, ready to be marketed.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 14, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 31, 2017, by Cajun Scrambler of Assumption, Louisiana. This page has been viewed 103 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 31, 2017.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.