Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building

 
 
The Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
1. The Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building Marker
Inscription.
This library and archives opened in 1961 to house and protect Texas’ priceless historical treasures and to support and improve library services in the state. Noted Texas authors, including James Michener, Walter Prescott Webb, and Jack “Jaxon” Jackson, used its resources for research and inspiration.

This site is dedicated as a Literary Landmark by the Association of Library Trustees, Advocates, Friends and Foundations on the occasion of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission’s 100th anniversary year.
 
Erected 2009 by ALTAFF, Texas Center for the Book, Friends of Libraries & Archives of Texas.
 
Location. 30° 16.44′ N, 97° 44.315′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Marker is on Brazos Street south of East 13th Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is mounted on pink granite pillar at main entrance to subject building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1201 Brazos St, Austin TX 78701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Texas and the Civil War (a few steps from this marker); The Archive War (within shouting distance of this marker); 1928 Granite Water Fountain
The Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
2. The Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building Cornerstone

This cornerstone located on opposite side of pillar from marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Hood’s Texas Brigade Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Artesian Well and East Drinking Fountain (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Cisterns (about 500 feet away); General Land Office Building of 1856-57 (about 600 feet away); St. Martin’s Evangelical Lutheran Church (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Austin.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building.
Former U.S. and Texas First Lady Laura Bush spoke at the Literary Landmark dedication. "Today's dedication recognizes the inspiration that the building and the resources it houses has provided for great writers for decades," said Mrs. Bush. (Submitted on January 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building.
The Texas State Archives contain Civil War records related to the state of Texas. These records consist primarily of Confederate pension applications and records of Texas state troops and militias. (Submitted on January 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building.
Named a National Literary Landmark, the Lorenzo
The Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
3. The Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building (wide view)

Marker is visible at eye-level on this side of left-most pillar
de Zavala State Archives and Library Building is the agency’s flagship located directly east of the Texas Capitol. View the six flags flown over Texas, our six Texas seal mosaics, the panoramic Texas history mural in our lobby, and our Texas history exhibits. (Submitted on January 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
The Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
4. The Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building (wide view)
General Sam Houston Statue (<i>near marker; left of entrance</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
5. General Sam Houston Statue (near marker; left of entrance)
Doctor Anson Jones Statue (<i>near marker; right of entrance</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
6. Doctor Anson Jones Statue (near marker; right of entrance)
French Seal Mosaic (1684–1689) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
7. French Seal Mosaic (1684–1689)
First of six country seal mosaics on library front wall representing the six countries which have claimed Texas since the 17th century. French Texas: (1684-1689)
Spanish Seal Mosaic (1690-1821) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
8. Spanish Seal Mosaic (1690-1821)
Second of six country seal mosaics on library front wall representing the six countries which have claimed Texas since the 17th century. Spanish Texas: (1690-1821)
Mexican Seal Mosaic (1821–1836) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
9. Mexican Seal Mosaic (1821–1836)
Third of six country seal mosaics on library front wall representing the six countries which have claimed Texas since the 17th century. Mexican Texas: (1821-1836)
Texas Seal Mosaic (1836-1845) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
10. Texas Seal Mosaic (1836-1845)
Fourth of six country seal mosaics on library front wall representing the six countries which have claimed Texas since the 17th century. Republic of Texas: (1836-1845)
C.S.A. Seal Mosaic (1861-1865) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
11. C.S.A. Seal Mosaic (1861-1865)
Fifth of six country seal mosaics on library front wall representing the six countries which have claimed Texas since the 17th century. Confederate States of America: (1861-1865)
U.S.A. Seal Mosaic (1845-1861, 1865+) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
12. U.S.A. Seal Mosaic (1845-1861, 1865+)
Sixth of six country seal mosaics on library front wall representing the six countries which have claimed Texas since the 17th century. United States of America: (1845-1861) & (1865-current)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 19, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 69 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   7, 8, 9. submitted on January 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   10, 11, 12. submitted on January 17, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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