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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mosier in Wasco County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Mosier

 
 
Mosier Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 13, 2015
1. Mosier Marker
Inscription.
Nestled bewteen the rainy Cascades and the eastern Oregon deserts, Mosier's unique climate enables hillsides to bloom in a pallet of color. In the spring, wildflower enthusiasts flock to Mosier for the spectacular array – “the Wildflower Capital of the World.”

Residents of Mosier have always welcomed travelers – even as far back as 1854, when Jonah H. Mosier settled here on a donation land claim. Mosier, a cabinetmaker by trade, had made the rugged trip west twice – to California in 1849, and again to Oregon in 1853. Mosier and his wife operated an impromptu stage station, catering to the hundreds of Oregon Trail emigrants who streamed down the Gorge on their way to the Willamette Valley.

The railroad arrived in 1882 and sparked a real estate boom as settlers, drawn by the ease of transportation and by reports of ideal apple-growing conditions, queued up to purchase land. As it turned out, cherries were far more suitable for the area's soil – but it would take many years for growers to realize this – and even more years for them to switch crops.

Mosier got another infusion of industry with the arrival of the Columbia River Highway in 1921. Roadhouses, restaurants, and service stations lined the scenic road where it passed through town,
Marker detail: Mosier Creek Bridge & Falls image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 13, 2015
2. Marker detail: Mosier Creek Bridge & Falls
and the hills echoed with the sputter and cough of touring cars on their way to or from The Dalles.

Sawmilling was Mosierís primary industry for many years; at one time, three mills processed logs from surrounding hills. Today cherry orchards dominate the industry.

Hike through the Mosier Twin Tunnels west of Mosier, or continue east along the highway, to discover Mosier Falls in Pocket Park and the Mosier Creek Bridge. Conde B. McCullough designed this graceful deck arch bridge. The bridge was completed in 1920.

Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

 
Location. 45° 41.03′ N, 121° 23.802′ W. Marker is in Mosier, Oregon, in Wasco County. Marker is on Historic Columbia River Highway (U.S. 30) east of Main Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located in a pull-out on the south side of the highway between Main Street and Oregon Street. Marker is at or near this postal address: 702 1st Ave, Mosier OR 97040, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Memaloose Overlook (approx. 2.3 miles away); Memaloose Rest Area Oregon Trail Kiosk (approx. 2.9 miles away); Memaloose—Island of the Dead
Marker detail: Sawmills & Orchards image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 13, 2015
3. Marker detail: Sawmills & Orchards
(approx. 3 miles away); Rowena Crest - The Rowena Loops (approx. 4.7 miles away); Rowena Crest - Ice Age Floods (approx. 4.7 miles away); A School with Roots (approx. 5.6 miles away); The Henderson (approx. 5.7 miles away); Hood River (approx. 5.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mosier.
 
Also see . . .
1. Mosier.
Mosier's white settler history dates to 1854, when Jonah H. Mosier (1821-1894) built a series of sawmills at the mouth of Mosier Creek. His son, Jefferson N. Mosier (1860-1928), platted the town and, like his father, became active in local and state affairs. During the late nineteenth century, Mosier had a railroad station and was a steamboat landing for boats headed upriver (Submitted on January 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. A History of Mosier.
Amos Root is credited with putting out the first commercial orchard (cherries, peaches, apples) in 1878. He and his wife, Hanna, motivated by difficulties with the Indians in Crook Co., moved from there where they had been in the sheep business to establish the Rosedale Fruit Farm in Mosier. Amos's grandson, Verne, and Bill Reeves each separately farm a portion Or the original
Mosier Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 13, 2015
4. Mosier Marker (wide view)
Amos Root holdings. In addition to Verne Root there are five other grandchildren who are living in Mosier. (Submitted on January 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Mosier Twin Tunnels.
The "Twin Tunnels" of Mosier were a part of the Historic Columbia River Highway. Engineered by John A. Elliot and constructed between 1919 and 1921, the tunnels were closed in 1955 with the completion of Interstate 84 following the banks of the Columbia River. Originally the tunnels were 17 feet wide but with the advent of larger cars they were widened to 20 feet. The Tunnels were closed in 1955 because of safety issues. With help of Senator Mark Hatfield, the twin tunnels were re-opened in July 2000 for bicycle and foot traffic, and are now part of a 4.6-mile-long "Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail". (Submitted on January 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. AgricultureRailroads & StreetcarsRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Marker detail: Mosier Area Map image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 13, 2015
5. Marker detail: Mosier Area Map
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 12, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 100 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on January 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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