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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cascade Locks in Hood River County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

The Bridge of the Gods

A Bridge Through Time

 
 
Bridge of the Gods Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2015
1. Bridge of the Gods Marker
Inscription.
Although steel has been made for centuries, it wasn’t until the Bessemer process was introduced in the 1870s that it could be produced in quantity.

The Bridge of the Gods mural is the creation of Larry Kangas, of Beaverton, Oregon. Commissioned by the city of Cascade Locks, and completed in November 2001, it’s a visual tour through the history of this beautiful area.

Visit the Cascade Locks Marine Park to see the original ship locks (listed in the National Register of Historic Places), an historical museum, the Oregon Pony, and a stern-wheeler.

1 - Can you see all three eagles? Hint: stand back on the sidewalk and look high and low.
2 - Wolf, bear, and cougar are important figures in Indian legends.
3 - Sasquatch ("Bigfoot") appears in Indian oral tradition as well. The artist claims that the Bigfoot drawing is based on an actual sighting he made from this spot while he worked on the mural late into the night. The locals think he probably just dozed off. What do you think?
4 -Coyote is an important figure in Indian legends: he's said to have created the River People, as well as the Columbia Gorge itself.
5 -People have lived here for at least 11,000 years. The "River People" who originally inhabited the Gorge
Bridge of the Gods Marker (<i>wide view; south bridge pier mural in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2015
2. Bridge of the Gods Marker (wide view; south bridge pier mural in background)
are the ancestors of today's Northwest Indian tribes.
6 -The sheer cliffs on Table Mountain (3,417') and Greenleaf Peak (3,422') were formed around 1700 by the Bonneville Slide, which also formed the ancient “Bridge of the Gods" and the Cascade rapids.
7 -The original "Bridge of the Gods" was an ancient land bridge recorded in Indian legend.
8 -Stern-wheelers plied the Columbia from 1850 to 1938. Pictured is the classic vessel, Tahoma.
9 -Cascade Locks was a busy waypoint for cars, and some steamboats and trains in the 1930s.
10 -The modem Bridge of the Gods was completed in 1926.
11 -Charles Lindbergh flew the Spirit of St. Louis under the bridge in 1927.
12 -The "locks" operated from 1896 to 1938, helping river travelers bypass the dangerous Cascade rapids.
13 -Lewis and Clark descended the Columbia River in 1805 and returned in 1806. They camped on the island near the Washington bank.
14 -The stern-wheeler Bailey Gatzert was a frequent visitor to Cascade Locks.
15 -The Oregon Pony was the first steam locomotive west of the Mississippi, and traveled the first railroad in the Northwest.
16 -The Bridge of the Gods was built by the Wanua Toll Bridge Company and was subsequently raised 40 feet to accommodate
Bridge of the Gods East Pier Mural image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2015
3. Bridge of the Gods East Pier Mural
ships after the construction of the Bonneville Dam.

Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Lewis & Clark Expedition marker series.
 
Location. 45° 39.71′ N, 121° 53.9′ W. Marker is in Cascade Locks, Oregon, in Hood River County. Marker is on Wa Pa Na Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located in the Columbia River Highway State Trail Bridge of the Gods Trailhead parking lot, beside the street, under the bridge, in front of the bridge pier. Marker is in this post office area: Cascade Locks OR 97014, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named The Bridge of the Gods (approx. 0.3 miles away in Washington); Lewis and Clark Trail (approx. 1.6 miles away in Washington); This Old Turbine (approx. 2.6 miles away in Washington); Bradford Island Fishway (approx. 2.6 miles away); Sturgeon Habitat (approx. 3.3 miles away); Beacon Rock (approx. 3˝ miles away); a different marker also named Beacon Rock (approx. 6.3 miles away in Washington); Oneonta Tunnel (approx. 9.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cascade Locks.
 
Related markers.
Bridge of the Gods (<i>north side & river view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2015
4. Bridge of the Gods (north side & river view)
Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ancient Land Bridge and Legend.
Scientists believe that about 1,000 years ago, a giant landslide from the north shore of the Columbia River blocked the Gorge and stopped the river’s flow. This natural dam created an inland sea in eastern Oregon, Washington, and into Idaho. Over time, water eroded the dam and created an awesome natural stone bridge. Eventually, this bridge fell, creating the Cascade rapids. (Submitted on January 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The History of Cascade Locks.
Pioneers traveling the Oregon Trail’s water route were forced to choose between taking the high, dangerous route over Mt. Hood’s steep Barlow Road, an overland toll road, or rafting down the Columbia, risking their life and property on the treacherous river. 1864, the first steam locomotive in the Pacific Northwest - the Oregon Pony - portaged steamboat passengers and goods past the Cascade Rapids. Steamboats provided transportation on the Columbia between Portland and mining areas in Idaho and the Columbia Plateau. (Submitted on January 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Charles Lindbergh and the Bridge of the Gods.
September 1927 - following Charles Lindbergh’s trans-Atlantic flight in May, Colonel Lindbergh himself flew up the gorge from Portland in his famous Spirit of St. Louis, passing low over the new Bridge of the Gods,
Bridge of the Gods (<i>south side view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2015
5. Bridge of the Gods (south side view)
banked his plane and in a dramatic show of barnstorming, flew under the bridge and headed back to Swan Island. (Submitted on January 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationMan-Made FeaturesNative AmericansWaterways & Vessels
 
Bridge of the Gods (<i>east pier view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2015
6. Bridge of the Gods (east pier view)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 17, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 63 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on January 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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