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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
White Hall in Lowndes County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Marchers, Supporters, Hecklers

Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail

 
 
Marchers, Supporters, Hecklers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 6, 2018
1. Marchers, Supporters, Hecklers Marker
Inscription. While helicopters buzzed overhead, National Guard soldiers—ordered by President Lyndon Johnson to protect the marchers—lined U.S. Highway 80, alert to the potential of violence by angry whites. Marchers walked mile after tired mile, while black supporters in Lowndes County—a county with no registered black voters at the beginning of 1965—left fields and homes to wave the marchers on. Local whites looked on in silent amazement and disgust, through some, seething with anger, jeered and sneered at marchers (right) as they passed by.

As you walked you saw people coming, waving, bringing you something to drink. You saw the power of the most powerful country on the face of the earth, the United States government. The United States military provided protection for this nonviolent crusade.
 
Erected 2015 by the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 32° 16.201′ N, 86° 43.617′ W. Marker is in White Hall, Alabama, in Lowndes County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 80 west of White Hall Road. Touch for map. Located within the National Park Service Lowndes Interpretive Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7002 US-80, Hayneville AL 36040, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8
Marker can be seen on left in front of the Magnolia tree along Highway 80. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 6, 2018
2. Marker can be seen on left in front of the Magnolia tree along Highway 80.
other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Day Two (a few steps from this marker); No Isolated Incident (within shouting distance of this marker); You Gotta Move (within shouting distance of this marker); A Price Paid (within shouting distance of this marker); After the March—Tent City (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); It Started in Selma (about 400 feet away); Holy Ground Battlefield (about 700 feet away); Mount Gillard Baptist Church (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in White Hall.
 
Regarding Marchers, Supporters, Hecklers. This National Park Service site is dedicated to those who peacefully marched 54 miles from Selma to the state capitol of Montgomery in order to gain the right to vote. This significant contribution to the trail serves as a reservoir of information about the unfortunate, yet significant, events that occurred in Lowndes County during the march. The museum exhibits interpret various events, including the confrontation of seminarian Jonathan Daniels; the slaying of Viola Liuzzo, a white woman who assisted the marchers by transporting them to Selma; and the establishment of Tent City, made up of temporary dwellings filled with cots, heaters, food and water that benefited families dislodged by white landowners in Lowndes County.

The
The National Park Service Lowndes Interpretive Center. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 6, 2018
3. The National Park Service Lowndes Interpretive Center.
$10 million structure was made possible through collaborative efforts between the National Park Service, the Federal Highway Administration and the Alabama Department of Transportation. There are no entrance fees required to visit this center.
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil Rights
 
One of many trail signs marking the route of the march. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 6, 2018
4. One of many trail signs marking the route of the march.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 9, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 7, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 91 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 7, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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