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Newport News, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Every Kind of Obstruction was Skillfully Used”

1862 Peninsula Campaign

 
 
"Every Kind of Obstruction was Skillfully Used" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 11, 2008
1. "Every Kind of Obstruction was Skillfully Used" Marker
Inscription. The Battle of Dam No. 1 proved a lost opportunity for the Union Army to break the Warwick-Yorktown line and force a Confederate withdrawal toward Richmond. Instead, Major General George McClellan spent another 17 days completing his heavy artillery emplacements. Furthermore, the Confederates retreated two days before the proposed Union grand barrage on May 5, 1862. Major General “Prince” John Magruderís troop maneuvers and elaborate defenses on the Warwick-Yorktown line halted the Army of the Potomac for one month.

The Union engineers detailed the abandoned Confederate artillery and surveyed their fortifications. Brigadier General John G. Barnard (the Chief Engineer of the Army of the Potomac) reported, “every kind of obstruction which the country offered, such as abatis, marsh, inundation was skillfully used. The line is certainly one of the most extensive known in modern times.” Thereby, the Confederacy gained valuable time for preparing Richmondís defenses. Today, the Warwick-Yorktown line remains one of the best preserved Civil War earthen fortifications in the country.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location.
Marker in Newport News Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 11, 2008
2. Marker in Newport News Park
Confederate fortifications can be seen in this photo behind the marker.
37° 11.22′ N, 76° 32.271′ W. Marker is in Newport News, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Constitution Way, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located in Newport News Park, on the Two Forts Walking Trail, on the north side of Lee Hall Reservoir. Marker is in this post office area: Newport News VA 23603, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. “The Bullets Would Whistle Around my Head” (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); One-Gun Battery (about 700 feet away); “Their Conduct was Worthy of Veterans” (about 800 feet away); “Just Like Sap – Boiling, in the Stream” (approx. 0.2 miles away); Third Regiment Vermont Volunteer Infantry (approx. 0.3 miles away); Battle of Leeís Mill (Dam Number 1) (approx. 0.3 miles away); Battle of Dam No. 1 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Ten Pound Parrott Rifle and Limber (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Newport News.
 
More about this marker. Two war-time photographs appear in the center of the marker. They are of Union Battery No. 1, Courtesy of the U.S. Army Military History Institute, and Dam No. 1, Courtesy of the Vermont Historical Society.
 
Related markers. Click here for
Marker on the Two Forts Trail image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 11, 2008
3. Marker on the Two Forts Trail
a list of markers that are related to this marker. Markers on the Two Forts Walking Trail in Newport News Park.
 
Also see . . .
1. Yorktown. CWSAC Battle Summaries. (Submitted on September 8, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Tidewater Virginia, The 1862 Peninsula Campaign. Civil War Traveler. (Submitted on September 8, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Civil
 
Confederate Earthworks image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 11, 2008
4. Confederate Earthworks
These earthworks, part of the Warwick-Yorktown line, are described on the marker as "one of the best preserved Civil War earthen fortifications in the country." They are found very near the marker, along the walking path.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 8, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,293 times since then and 65 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 8, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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