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Ninety Six in Greenwood County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Rifle Tower

June 13, 1781

 
 
Current The Rifle Tower Marker and Reconstructed Tower image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
1. Current The Rifle Tower Marker and Reconstructed Tower
Inscription.
In a single night -- June 13 -- a 30-foot tower made of interlocking logs was erected under Kosciuszko's supervision. From the wooden platform marksmen could aim down into the fort. The Loyalists responded to this threat by making the walls nearly three feet higher with sandbags. The Loyalists tried unsuccessfully to burn down the tower by firing heated cannon balls.
 
Erected 2009 by National Park Service.
 
Location. 34° 8.793′ N, 82° 1.137′ W. Marker is in Ninety Six, South Carolina, in Greenwood County. Marker can be reached from South Cambridge Street. Touch for map. Marker is on the grounds of Ninety Six Historic Park, battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Ninety Six SC 29666, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Mine (within shouting distance of this marker); Second Approach Trench (within shouting distance of this marker); Second Parallel (within shouting distance of this marker); The Attack (within shouting distance of this marker); The Forlorn Hope (within shouting distance of this marker); Approach Trench
Current The Rifle Tower Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
2. Current The Rifle Tower Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Star Fort (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Well (about 300 feet away); Covered Way (about 300 feet away); The Artillery (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ninety Six.
 
More about this marker. Marker shown in Photo 1 is the current version of the marker.
 
Also see . . .  Ninety Six National Historic Site. Here settlers struggled against the harsh backcountry to survive, Cherokee Indians hunted and fought to keep their land, two towns and a trading post were formed and abandoned to the elements, and two Revolutionary War battles that claimed over 100 lives took place here. (Submitted on September 8, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, CastlesMan-Made FeaturesMilitaryNotable EventsNotable PersonsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Previous The Rifle Tower Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 5, 2008
3. Previous The Rifle Tower Marker
As the Patriots moved within musket range of the Star Fort, British marksmen subjected them to intense fire. A number of Americans were killed or wounded.

To counter this hazardous fire, Greene ordered the construction of a rifle tower. On June 13, under cover of darkness, the Americans worked feverishly to build a log tower about thirty feet high. At daybreak on June 14, Greene stationed riflemen on the tower who could now fire over the fort wall at men inside. The American rifle fire was deadly. Greene reported that "not a Man could show his Head but he was immediately shot down..."

Cruger raised the fort walls an additional three feet with sandbags to give his men greater protection. He also attempted to burn the tower by firing heated cannonballs at it, but since the wood was green the effort failed.
Current Marker and Rifle Tower Reconstruction image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
4. Current Marker and Rifle Tower Reconstruction
Reconstructed Rifle Tower, Facing East image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 5, 2008
5. Reconstructed Rifle Tower, Facing East
Reconstructed Rifle Tower image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
6. Reconstructed Rifle Tower
Reconstructed Rifle Tower image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
7. Reconstructed Rifle Tower
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 8, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 861 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on September 8, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on July 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on September 8, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6, 7. submitted on July 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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