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Ninety Six in Greenwood County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Mine

Begun June 9, 1781

 
 
Current The Mine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
1. Current The Mine Marker
Inscription.
"We shall be in the ditch of the enemies works by tomorrow night or early morning; and the powder is wanting to blow up the works. I beg you will send the powder the moment this reaches you."
General Nathanael Greene to General Andrew Pickens, June 11, 1781

Now that the Patriots were in striking distance of the fort walls, Kosciuszko decided to use another classic siege tactic -- a mine. The plan was simple. Gunpowder packed in the mine's primary tunnel would be detonated, causing a breach, which would allow Greene's men to rush into the fort from nearby approach trenches.

Using picks and shovels to carve out the hard earth, laborers began to dig the main shaft on June 9. Progress in the late spring heat and under constant Loyalist fire was painfully slow.

The Star Fort siege ended before Kosciuszko's mine could prove its worth. Learning that the Loyalists were getting reinforcements, Greene called off the effort, and digging stopped short of the fort's ditch.

The cone-shaped earthen passage with no beams ot supports, ran 125 feet from end to end, and is a unique example of Revolutionary War-era mine construction. The mine is one of the few remaining earthworks of the Revolutionary War. It is not accessible to visitors.
 
Erected 2009
The Mine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
2. The Mine Marker
by National Park Service.
 
Location. 34° 8.778′ N, 82° 1.143′ W. Marker is in Ninety Six, South Carolina, in Greenwood County. Marker can be reached from South Cambridge Street. Touch for map. Marker is on the grounds of Ninety Six Historic Park battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Ninety Six SC 29666, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Attack (within shouting distance of this marker); The Rifle Tower (within shouting distance of this marker); The Forlorn Hope (within shouting distance of this marker); Second Approach Trench (within shouting distance of this marker); The Star Fort (within shouting distance of this marker); Covered Way (within shouting distance of this marker); Second Parallel (within shouting distance of this marker); The Well (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Approach Trench (about 300 feet away); First Parallel (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ninety Six.
 
More about this marker. The current marker is shown in Photo 1.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ninety Six National Historic Site (U.S. National Park Service). Here settlers struggled against the harsh backcountry to survive, Cherokee Indians hunted
Current The Mine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
3. Current The Mine Marker
and fought to keep their land, two towns and a trading post were formed and abandoned to the elements, and two Revolutionary War battles that claimed over 100 lives took place here. (Submitted on September 8, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Nathanael Greene. Nathanael Greene (August 7, 1742 – June 19, 1786) was a major general of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War. (Submitted on July 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Tadeusz Kościuszko. Andrzej Tadeusz Bonawentura Kościuszko (February 4, 1746 – October 15, 1817) was a Polish-Lithuanian general and military leader during the Kościuszko Uprising. He is a national hero in Poland, Lithuania, the United States and Belarus. (Submitted on July 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Andrew Pickens. Andrew Pickens (September 13, 1739 – August 11, 1817) was a militia leader in the American Revolution and a member of the United States House of Representatives from South Carolina. (Submitted on July 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, CastlesLandmarksMan-Made FeaturesNotable EventsNotable PersonsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Current The Mine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
4. Current The Mine Marker
Original The Mine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 5, 2008
5. Original The Mine Marker
From the third parallel, Kosciuszko began constructing a mine. American sappers dug a perpendicular shaft about six feet deep, then began a tunnel toward the Star Fort.

Kosciuszko planned to extend the tunnel to a chamber beneath the fort wall. Gunpowder packed in the chamber would be exploded to blow an opening in the fort parapet and allow Patriot troops to charge inside.

Kosciuszko's mine was not used, however, because the siege ended before the tunnel was finished.
Walking Trail Leading to The Mine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 5, 2008
6. Walking Trail Leading to The Mine Marker
Visible in the background is the outline of the mine, shown by the white string staked down.
The Mine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
7. The Mine Marker
The End of Mine image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 5, 2008
8. The End of Mine
Historical Photograph of the Mine image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
9. Historical Photograph of the Mine
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 8, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 760 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5, 6. submitted on September 8, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on July 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   8. submitted on September 8, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   9. submitted on July 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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