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Columbia in Richland County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Trinity Episcopal Church

 
 
Trinity Episcopal Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 2008
1. Trinity Episcopal Church Marker
Inscription.
Parish organized 1812. Original Church dedicated 1814; Present church 1846. In the churchyard lie buried three Wade Hamptons; Thomas Cooper, Educator; Henry Timrod, Poet; W.C. Preston, U.S. Senator; Five Governors of S.C.: Three Mannings, Hampton and Thompson; Soldiers of the Revolutionary and later American Wars, including Colonel Peter Horry, Generals Ellison Capers, John S. Preston and States Rights Gist.
 
Erected 1938 by The Columbia Sesquicentennial Commission of 1936. (Marker Number 40-1.)
 
Location. 34° 0.064′ N, 81° 1.895′ W. Marker is in Columbia, South Carolina, in Richland County. Marker is on Sumter Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Opposite East side of State House Grounds. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1100 Sumter Street, Columbia SC 29201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Memory of South Carolina Generals (within shouting distance of this marker); Wade Hampton (within shouting distance of this marker); Henry Disbrow Phillips, D.D. (within shouting distance of this marker); James F. Byrnes (within shouting distance of this marker);
Trinity Episcopal Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
2. Trinity Episcopal Church Marker
Senate Street (within shouting distance of this marker); Sumter Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gonzales Tribute (about 300 feet away); African-American History Monument (about 300 feet away); Battleship Maine Memorial (about 300 feet away); Birthplace of General Maxcy Gregg (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Columbia.
 
Regarding Trinity Episcopal Church. Trinity Episcopal Church’s chief significance is architectural. It was designed ca. 1840 by Edward Brickell White, who also designed the steeple of St. Philip’s Church and Grace Church in Charleston. Modeled after Yorkminster Cathedral in England, the church is an example of English Gothic Revival style with a cruciform shape, two ornate front towers, arched oak doors, and four-shouldered buttresses. It is one of the earliest examples of ecclesiastical Gothic architecture in the South. Most of its stained glass windows were imported from Munich ca. 1860 and its marble baptismal font was designed by Hiram Powers. Founded in 1812, the first frame church building
National Register Medalion image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
3. National Register Medalion
was completed in 1814. The present building was begun in 1845 and finished in present form 1894. The towers and nave were constructed first, with the transepts added and chancel extended in 1861-1862 under White’s direction. The church escaped burning in 1865 by General W.T. Sherman, who was a Roman Catholic, by the removal of its “Episcopal” signs, and the placing of papier-mâché crosses on the edges of its roof. Buried in its adjacent historic graveyard are five South Carolina governors, two Revolutionary War officers, three Confederate generals, the poet Henry Timrod, the three Wade Hamptons, surveyor John Gabriel Guignard, and Dr. Thomas Cooper. Listed in the National Register February 24, 1971.(South Carolina Department of Archives and History)

National Register of Historic Places:
Trinity Episcopal Church ** (added 1971 - - #71000805)
1100 Sumter St. , Columbia
♦ Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering
♦ Architect, builder, or engineer: White, Edward Brickell
♦ Architectural Style: Gothic
♦ Area of Significance: Architecture, Religion
♦ Period of Significance: 1875-1899, 1850-1874, 1825-1849
♦ Owner: Private
♦ Historic Function: Religion
♦ Historic Sub-function: Religious Structure
♦ Current Function: Religion
Trinity Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
4. Trinity Episcopal Church
Legend has it that Gen. Sherman believed this was a Roman Catholic Church, and since his wife was Catholic, he spared the torch.
Current Sub-function: Religious Structure
_M.S._
 
Also see . . .
1. Trinity Episcopal Cathedral. On February 17, 1865, the troops of General William Tecumseh Sherman entered the city. The next morning, one-third of Columbia was in ashes. The fires raged all around Trinity, but miraculously the church was spared. (Submitted on May 7, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Trinity Episcopal Church. Trinity Episcopal Church’s chief significance is architectural. (Submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Wade Hampton I. Wade Hampton (1752 – February 4, 1835) was a South Carolina soldier, politician, two-term U.S. Congressman, and wealthy plantation owner. (Submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Wade Hampton II. Wade Hampton II (April 21, 1791 – February 10, 1858) was an American plantation owner and soldier in the War of 1812. (Submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Wade Hampton III. Wade Hampton III (March 28, 1818 – April 11, 1902) was a Confederate cavalry leader during the American Civil War and afterward a politician from South Carolina, serving as its 77th Governor and as a U.S. Senator. (Submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Thomas Cooper
Trinity Episcopal Church 2010 Renovation image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 9, 2010
5. Trinity Episcopal Church 2010 Renovation
. Thomas Cooper (October 22, 1759 – May 11, 1839) was an American economist, college president and political philosopher. (Submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Henry Timrod. Henry Timrod (December 8, 1828 - October 7, 1867) was an American poet, often called the poet laureate of the Confederacy. (Submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. William C. Preston. William Campbell Preston (December 27, 1794 – May 22, 1860) was a senator from the United States and a member of the Nullifier, and later Whig Parties. (Submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. Peter Horry. Peter Horry (1743 or 1747 – 28 February 1815) was a South Carolina militia leader. (Submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

10. Ellison Capers. Ellison Capers (October 14, 1837 – April 22, 1908) was a school teacher, Confederate general in the American Civil War, theologian, and college administrator from South Carolina. (Submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

11. John S. Preston. John Smith Preston (April 20, 1809 – May 1, 1881) was a wealthy planter, soldier, and attorney who became prominent in South Carolina politics in
Trinity Episcopal Church Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
6. Trinity Episcopal Church Cornerstone
E. B. White -
Architect.
E.W. Brown -
Builder.
1846.
the 19th century. (Submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

12. States Rights Gist. States Rights Gist (September 3, 1831 – November 30, 1864) was a lawyer, a militia general in South Carolina, and a Confederate Army brigadier general who served during the American Civil War. (Submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Trinity Episcopal Church - National Register Nomination Form (1970)
Description
Buff-plastered English Gothic Revival style with arched oak doors; ornate twin towers each supporting eight pinnacles with fleur de lis ornaments. Designed 1840 by Charleston architect Edward Brickwell White, church has cruciform shape, four-shouldered buttresses, ornamented pinnacles along edges of roof. Transepts added and chancel extended 1861-1862 under White's direction. Most stained glass windows, including rose windows in transepts, imported from Munich c. 1860. Second building begun 1845 to replace frame church built 1814. Towers and nave constructed first; finished in present form 1894.

Inside church is marble baptismal font designed by Hiram Powers. Wooden roof on hammer-beam trusses. Box pews, brass pulpit, tiled floor in sanctuary,
Cemetery, as mentioned on Marker, with Civil War Veteran's grave visible from sidewalk image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
7. Cemetery, as mentioned on Marker, with Civil War Veteran's grave visible from sidewalk
marble chancel rail, and handcarved walnut choir stalls. Only church in city with clerestory. Large memorial stained glass window commemorates Peter Shand, pastor from 1834-1886, above white marble alter. smaller windows above columned arcades in clerestory.

Wrought iron fencing and gates surround church and graveyard.

Significance
Trinity Episcopal Church’s chief significance is architectural. It was designed by Edward Brickell White, who also designed the steeple of St. Philip’s Church, the Huguenot Church, and Grace Church in Charleston. Of English Gothic Revival style with two ornate front towers, arched oak doors, and four-shouldered buttresses, it was modeled after Yorkminster Cathedral in England. It is one of the earliest examples of ecclesiastical Gothic architecture in the South. Its stained glass windows, except for a few memorials, were imported from Munich ca. 1860, and its marble baptismal font was designed by Hiram Powers.

Founded in 1812, the first Trinity church building was completed in 1814 on lands donated by Gen. C.C. Pinckney, Elias Horry, and Peter Smith of Charleston, and the South Carolina legislature. Its first pastor, Rev. Christian Hanckell, (1815-1821) was also a professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at the South Carolina College during the early years of his ministry. After the Civil War he became state
Trinity Episcopal Church<br>West Facade (Sumter Street) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
8. Trinity Episcopal Church
West Facade (Sumter Street)
agent of the Episcopal Freedmans Aid Commission, which distributed money raised in the north to newly emancipated southern blacks. The church escaped burning in 1865 by Sherman, who was a Roman Catholic, by the removal, it is said, of its "Episcopal" signs, and the placing of paper mache crosses on the edges of its roof. From 1834 to 1888 its pastor was Peter Shand, under whose leadership the congregation quintupled. By 1938 Trinity had the largest Episcopal congregation in the state.

In its adjacent historic graveyard are buried five South Carolina governors, two Revolutionary War officers, three Confederate generals, the poet Henry Timrod, the three Wade Hamptons, John Gabriel Guignard, surveyor of Columbia, and Dr. Thomas Cooper, controversial nationally-known president of South Carolina College, and close friend of Thomas Jefferson.

In 1962 the American House of Bishops, compromised of all the Episcopal bishops in the United States, met at Trinity. The bishops were addressed by Arthur Michael Ramsey, archbishop of Canterbury.
    — Submitted July 28, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
Trinity Episcopal Church Portico image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
9. Trinity Episcopal Church Portico
Trinity Episcopal Church Towers image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
10. Trinity Episcopal Church Towers
Trinity Episcopal Church Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
11. Trinity Episcopal Church Entrance
Trinity Episcopal Church Timeline image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
12. Trinity Episcopal Church Timeline
Founded 1812
as
Trinity Church
The First Episcopal Church
Established
In South Carolina After
The American Revolution
+++
This Structure Erected
1846
and
Enlarged and Remodeled
1860-1862
+++
Cathedral
The
Diocese of Upper South Carolina
1977
+++
Bicentennial Restoration
2007-2010
Trinity Episcopal Church Tower image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
13. Trinity Episcopal Church Tower
Trinity Episcopal Church<br>North Facade image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
14. Trinity Episcopal Church
North Facade
Trinity Episcopal Church American Revolution Bicentennial Richmond County Committee Medallion image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
15. Trinity Episcopal Church American Revolution Bicentennial Richmond County Committee Medallion
Trinity Episcopal Church Medallions image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
16. Trinity Episcopal Church Medallions
At left of steps, barely visible is the American Revolution Bicentennial Richmond County Committee Medallion, and at right is the National Register Medallion
Trinity Episcopal Church, West Front image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey, Jack E. Boucher, circa April 1960
17. Trinity Episcopal Church, West Front
Historic American Engineering Record HABS SC, 40-COLUM, 14-1 SC 355-1
Trinity Episcopal Church, NAVE, looking toward alter image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey, Jack E. Boucher, circa April 1960
18. Trinity Episcopal Church, NAVE, looking toward alter
Historic American Engineering Record, HABS SC, 40-COLUM, 14-2 SC 355-2
Henry Disbrow Phillips, D.D. Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
19. Henry Disbrow Phillips, D.D. Tombstone
January 16, 1882 - June 29, 1955
Bishop of Southwestern Virginia
1938 - 1954
Rector of Trinity Church Columbia
1921 - 1938
Ella Reese Phillips Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
20. Ella Reese Phillips Tombstone
Nov. 11, 1883 - Apr. 20, 1977
Wife of
Bishop Henry D. Phillips
Daughter of
Ella Par and Frederick Focke Reese
Bishop of Georgia
Henry D. Phillips Plot image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
21. Henry D. Phillips Plot
Wade Hampton II Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
22. Wade Hampton II Tombstone
Son of
Gen. Wade Hampton I and
Harriet Flud Hampton
Born in Columbia
April 21, 1791
Died Feb'y 9, 1858
Ann Hampton Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
23. Ann Hampton Tombstone
Tribute of Affection
to the Memory of
Mrs. Ann Hampton
Consort of Col. Wade Hampton II
and daughter of the late
Christopher Fitzsimmons, Esq.
Born January 1794-Died February 1833
This exemplary and interesting woman
died as she had lived an example of every
ennobling quality of mind and every softer
virtue of the heart which could dignify
the Christian or adorn the
human character.
----------
Thou are gone to the grave, but we will not deplore thee
where God was the ransom thy guardian and guide
He have thee, he took thee - and he will restore thee
and Death has no sting, for the Saviour has died.
Harriet Flud Hampton Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
24. Harriet Flud Hampton Tombstone
Daughter of
Wade and Ann Hampton
Born April 16, 1823
Died June 2, 1848
Whose faith follow
Heb. XIII, VII
Wade Hampton III Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
25. Wade Hampton III Tombstone
Sacred
to the Memory of
Wade Hampton III
1861 Lieut General C.S.A. 1865
Son of
Wade and Anne Fitzsimons Hampton
Born in Charleston
March 28, 1818
Died in Columbia
April 11, 1902
Whole Hearted, True Hearted, Faithful and Loyal
Thine, O Lord, is the greatness and the
power and the glory and the victory and
the majesty and in thine hand it is to make
great and to give strength.

I Chronicles 29th Chapter 11th Verse
Wade Hampton IV Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
26. Wade Hampton IV Tombstone
Major Wade Hampton IV
Son of
Gen. Wade and Margaret Hampton
Born March 24th 1840
Died December 22nd 1879
Thy rod and Thy staff They comfort me
Kirkman George Finlay Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
27. Kirkman George Finlay Tombstone
1877-1938
Numbered with thy saints
in glory everlasting
First Bishop
of the Diocese of
Upper South Carolina
Lucy Reed Finlay Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
28. Lucy Reed Finlay Tombstone
Lucy Reed Finlay
Wife of
Kirkman George Finlay
August 21, 1878
November 3, 1965
States Right Gist Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
29. States Right Gist Tombstone
In Memory
of
Brig. Gen.
States Right Gist
Born in Union District, So.Ca.
September 3rd 1831
Killed in Battle at Franklin, Tenn
November 30th 1864.
Rev. Robert W. and Mary S. Barnwell Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
30. Rev. Robert W. and Mary S. Barnwell Tombstone
In Memory of
Rev. Robert W. Barnwell
Ordained in the Protestant Episcopal Church,
he was elected Chaplin and Professor
of History to the South Carolina College
and became pre-eminent alike in the
pulpit and the lecture room.
On the breaking out of the War he
followed his pupils to the front
still devoting himself to his State by
his labors in the Hospitals for her Sons.
He died in Virginia of Typhoid Fever,
worn out by his ceaseless toil for the
sick and wounded soldier.
June 23rd 1863
aged 32 years.
And of his beloved wife
Mary Carter Singleton
Born Nov. 9th 1837
Died June 25th 1863
They were lovely and pleasant in their
lives and in death they were not divided.
Maximilian LaBorge image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
31. Maximilian LaBorge
Born at Edgefield June 5 1804
graduated at S.C. College 1820
Received Degree of M.D. from
Medical College of Charleston
1826. Chosen a member of
House of Representatives 1838.
Elected Secretary of State 1839.
Professor in S.C. College 1847-1873.
Vestryman of Trinity Church 1842-
1873. Established Wayside Hospitals
in Va. 1861. Chairman of Central
Association for Relief of S.C.
Soldiers 1862-1865. Died at S.C.
College Nov. 6, 1873.
Hugh Smith Thompson Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
32. Hugh Smith Thompson Tombstone
1836 - 1904
State Superintendent of
Education 1876 - 1882
Governor of South Carolina
1882-1886
Scholar, Soldier, Statesman
In Public Service, Faithful
and Able
In Private Live, Loving
and Beloved.
Clarence Alfred Cole Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
33. Clarence Alfred Cole Tombstone
June 15, 1909 - April 11, 1963
Third Bishop
Diocese of Upper South Carolina
1953 - 1963
Alexander Falls Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
34. Alexander Falls Tombstone
This monument
is erected as a feeble
tribute of respect to my
affectionate husband
Alexander Falls
who was born in the City
of New York July 14, 1812.
In 1845, he moved to
South Carolina, and was
engaged as a merchant in
Columbia, until suddenly
stricken by disease. He died
in this city March 27, 1862
aged 49 years, 8 months
and 13 days.
I know thou art gone to the home of thy rest,
Then why should my soul be so sad!
I know thou art gone where the weary are blest
And I hope! though I mourn and am glad.
John H. Peare Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
35. John H. Peare Tombstone
Erected
to the memory of
John H. Peare
who was born in
Galway, Ireland
Dec 17th 1818
and died in Columbia S.C.
March 27th 1860
by his Brethren, the members of
Richland Lodge, No. 39, A.F.M.
in respect for his memory.
Charles Booth Satterlee Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
36. Charles Booth Satterlee Tombstone
Born March 26, 1855
Graduated West Point 1876
Capt 6th Artillery
Battery K U.S. Army
Died July 10, 1899
at his post of Duty
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands
This is the Victory
Even Our Faith
Jesse Howell Trezevant/Willoughby Farqunar Trezevant Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
37. Jesse Howell Trezevant/Willoughby Farqunar Trezevant Tombstone
Jesse Howell Trezevant
Born Aug. 31, 1842
Enlisted private Dec. 27, 1860
in Columbia E Artillery
Served in bombardment of Fort Sumter
Reenlisted in Congaree Troop of Hampton Legion Killed in Battle of Gaines Mill June 27, 1862.
----------
Willoughby Farqunar Trezevant
Born Jan'y 19, 1846
Member of Cadet Corps So.Ca.Col.
Detailed to serve as Courier for Gen. N.G. Evans
Mortally wounded in battle of Sharpsburg, Md.
Sept. 17, 1862
Died at Sheppardstown, Va., Sept. 24, 1862.
Ellison and Rebecca Capers Tombstone<br>Northeast Corner image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
38. Ellison and Rebecca Capers Tombstone
Northeast Corner
Born in Charleston October 14th 1837
Died in Columbia April 22nd 1908
----------
He rendered unto Caesar the things that are Caesar's
and unto God the things that are God's.
Ellison and Rebecca Capers Tombstone<br>Southwest Corner image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
39. Ellison and Rebecca Capers Tombstone
Southwest Corner
Ellison Capers
Brigadier General
in the Southern Confederacy
Secretary of State of
South Carolina
Priest of the
Protestant Episcopal Church
Bishop of the
Diocese of South Carolina
Chancellor of the
University of the South

Charlotte Rebecca
Wife of Ellison Capers
Born in St. John's Parish February 11th 1837
Died in Columbia August 13th 1908
----------
Looking unto Jesus she glorified every relationship in
life, being faithful unto death.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 7, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,470 times since then and 20 times this year. Last updated on September 8, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. Photos:   1. submitted on May 7, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2, 3. submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on May 7, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5. submitted on May 9, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6. submitted on August 24, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   7. submitted on May 7, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   12. submitted on July 31, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   13, 14. submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   15, 16. submitted on July 31, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   17, 18. submitted on May 8, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39. submitted on July 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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