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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Adams Morgan in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Serving the Neighborhood

Roads to Diversity

 

—Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —

 
Serving the Neighborhood Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 13, 2018
1. Serving the Neighborhood Marker
Inscription.
Furs by Gartenhaus and truffles by Avignon Freres. Hand-crafted ice cream from Budd's. Beginning in the 1910s, such neighborhood favorites occupied the commercial buildings to your right developed by Sanner and Barr. These fashionable shops catered to the 18th and Columbia neighborhood and drew Washingtonians from all over. Even Senator Harry S. Truman and General Dwight D. Eisenhower enjoyed French pastries in Agivnon Freres's first garden tea room, 2429 18th Street. In 1940, when Isidore Gartenhaus opened a fur shop at 1789 Columbia Road, this area was still "a little Park Avenue," recalled his son Stanley. The thriving business eventually moved to the former Riggs Bank at 1801 Adams Mill Road.

After World War II (1941-1945), businesses began changing as people of means moved to more suburban locations. Residential buildings had aged, leading to lower rents that attracted a diverse population seeking affordable housing. Yet Furs by Gartenhaus remained until after the riots that followed the 1968 assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Then the furrier moved to Bethesda, Maryland. Avignon Freres remained in the Orcino family until 1986. By the mid-1970s, new Latino enterprises catered to immigrants, while a few hip shops drew cosmopolitan shoppers.

First Church of Christ, Scientist, to your left,
Serving the Neighborhood Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 13, 2018
2. Serving the Neighborhood Marker
opened in 1912, 30 years after church founder Mary Baker Eddy first lectured in Washington. The church donated the land for Unity Park to the community. It also served as an aid station for the victims of the tragic Knickerbocker Theater roof collapse in 1922. More recently its youth camps serve the neighborhood.
 
Erected 2005 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 8 of 18.)
 
Location. 38° 55.402′ N, 77° 2.508′ W. Marker is in Adams Morgan, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Columbia Road Northwest north of Euclid Street NW, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20009, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A People Without Murals Is A Demuralized People (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Tragedy at 18th and Columbia (about 300 feet away); "Suburban" Development (about 400 feet away); The Artistic Life (about 600 feet away); Lanier Place (about 700 feet away); Walter Pierce Park (about 800 feet away); Kalorama Triangle (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Ontario Theater (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Adams Morgan.
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionHispanic AmericansIndustry & CommerceWar, World II
 
Serving the Neighborhood Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 13, 2018
3. Serving the Neighborhood Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 16, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 13, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 64 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 13, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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