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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Navy Yard in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

1865-1869

 
 
1865-1869 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 15, 2018
1. 1865-1869 Marker
Inscription.
Chinese were hired to do the dangerous work of blasting and laying ties over the treacherous High Sierras. Comprising nearly 80% of Central Pacific's workforce, their contributions made possible the Transcontinental Railroad.

Chinese workers along the route of the Northern Pacific Railroad, location unknown. University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections, UW522. 1841-649: Chinese, Central Pacific railroad worker, 1868-69. Institution: Northeastern Nevada Museum.

 
Erected by United States Department of Transportation.
 
Location. 38° 52.577′ N, 77° 0.05′ W. Marker is in Navy Yard, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of M Street SE and 4th Street SE, on the right when traveling east on M Street SE. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington DC 20003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1830 (here, next to this marker); Switching Yard (here, next to this marker); 1840-1950 (here, next to this marker); 1817 (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named 1830 (a few steps from this marker); 1825 (a few steps from this marker); 1827 (a few steps from this marker); 1833 (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Navy Yard.
 
Categories. Asian AmericansRailroads & Streetcars
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 19, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 15, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 59 times since then. Photo   1. submitted on January 15, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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