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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Eugene in Lane County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

A.W. and Amanda Patterson Home

“Animal House”

 
 
A.W. and Amanda Patterson Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, December 12, 2014
1. A.W. and Amanda Patterson Home Marker
Inscription. Site of the home of A. W. and Amanda Patterson. He was a pioneer Lane County doctor and surveyor who plotted a greater part of Eugene. In 1853, Patterson was also a member of the Oregon legislature and was instrumental in establishing the University of Oregon.

Amanda Patterson came across the Great Plains in the first wagon train of 1843. Their daughter, Ida, was a Eugene school principal. In the 1950's and 1960's the house was used by a fraternity and popularized in the late 1970's by the film "Animal House."
 
Location. 44° 2.868′ N, 123° 4.875′ W. Marker is in Eugene, Oregon, in Lane County. Marker is on East 11th Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Eugene OR 97401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Patterson Home Site / Animal House (here, next to this marker); The Collier House (approx. 0.4 miles away); Granite Glacial Erratic (approx. 0.7 miles away); Petrified Wood (approx. 0.7 miles away); Shelton – McMurphey House (approx. 0.8 miles away); Site of First Cabin in Eugene (approx. 1.1 miles away); Eugene Skinner (approx. 1.1 miles away); Wiley Griffon (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Eugene.
 
More about this marker.
A.W. and Amanda Patterson Home image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen
2. A.W. and Amanda Patterson Home
This image is included in Building Oregon: Architecture of Oregon and the Pacific Northwest, a digital collection which provides documentation about the architectural heritage of the Pacific Northwest.
This plaque's text can be confusing to the reader because it contains no picture or indication of the current state of the Patterson home and almost hints that a couple of fraternity houses on either side of the plaque were the site of the Patterson home (they weren't). The Patterson residence was demolished in 1986 and is now the parking lot seen behind the plaque and boulder. In addition, the home depicted in the movie Animal House was actually the second home for Amanda Patterson, who had it built in 1910 after her husband died.
 
Regarding A.W. and Amanda Patterson Home. Wikipedia tells us: The actual house depicted as the Delta House was originally a residence in Eugene, the Dr. A.W. Patterson House. Around 1959, it was acquired by the Psi Deuteron chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity and was their chapter house until 1967, when the chapter was closed due to low membership. The house was sold and slid into disrepair, with the spacious porch removed and the lawn graveled over. At the time of the shooting, the Phi Kappa Psi and Sigma Nu fraternity houses sat next to the old Phi Sigma Kappa house. The interior of the Sigma Nu house was used for many of the interior scenes, but the individual rooms were filmed on a soundstage. The Patterson house was demolished in 1986.[11] The site is now occupied by Northwest Christian
A.W. and Amanda Patterson Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, December 12, 2014
3. A.W. and Amanda Patterson Home Marker
University's school of Education and Counseling. A large boulder placed to the west of the parking entrance displays a bronze plaque commemorating the Delta House location. The parade scene takes place in downtown Cottage Grove, Oregon on Main Street.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia on Animal House history. (Submitted on January 17, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.)
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 20, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 17, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. This page has been viewed 42 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 17, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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