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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anacostia in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Rose's Row

An East-of-the-River View

 

—Anacostia Heritage Trail —

 
Rose's Row Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 15, 2018
1. Rose's Row Marker
Inscription. Across the intersection to your left is Rose's Row, three one-family and three two-family houses built in 1890 by local saloon-keeper William H. Rose. Rose's son Daniel designed them in the popular Italianate style and carefully crafted a cornice that wraps the corner house, which became the Rose family's home. Rehabilitated in the late 1980s, the row endures as a fine example of Uniontown style.

This block is also distinguished by the work of two locally prominent architects. Lewis W. Giles, Sr. designed the two apartment buildings at 1222 U (1933) and 1218 (1940). Across the street, George T. Santmyers contributed the Georgian style row of 1233-1255 U Street in 1925 and 1926.

Like many aging DC neighborhoods, Anacostia fell into decline in the 1960s. In response to zoning changes, between 1950 and 1970 Anacostia went from a community of mostly single-family houses to one dominated by hastily built apartments and public housing projects. Urban renewal elsewhere had pushed people with few resources into Anacostia. Schools were overcrowded, city services were strained, and crime plagued many blocks. Conditions were so bad that in 1971 neighborhood leaders filed a lawsuit claiming that discriminatory DC government policies and neglect were to blame.

Though the lawsuit was dismissed, leaders pressed
Rose's Row Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 15, 2018
2. Rose's Row Marker
on. As a consequence, the city improved public services and funded rehabilitation of historic properties. In 1978 residents arranged for designation of the Anacostia Historic District, which brought attention to the unique architecture and landscape here. Zoning laws changed in the 1990s to encourage construction of rowhouses and other smaller-scale dwellings.
 
Erected 2013 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 20 of 20.)
 
Location. 38° 51.972′ N, 76° 59.238′ W. Marker is in Anacostia, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of U Street Southeast and 13th Street SE, on the left when traveling west on U Street Southeast. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1263 U St SE, Washington DC 20020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mother Churches and Their Daughters (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); A Neighborhood Oasis (about 500 feet away); Uniontown, DC's First Suburb (about 600 feet away); Booth's Escape (about 600 feet away); The Big Chair (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named The Big Chair
Rose's Row Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 15, 2018
3. Rose's Row Marker
(about 700 feet away); The World’s Largest Chair (about 700 feet away); Transit and Trade (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anacostia.
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkEducation
 
Rose's Row image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 15, 2018
4. Rose's Row
1222 U Street, SE image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 15, 2018
5. 1222 U Street, SE
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 25, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 15, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 69 times since then. Last updated on January 18, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 15, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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