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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anacostia in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Transit and Trade

An East-of-the-River View

 

—Anacostia Heritage Trail —

 
Transit and Trade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 15, 2018
1. Transit and Trade Marker
Inscription. The arrival of modern transportation after the Civil War transformed Anacostia. The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad opened a branch line along the river here in 1874, brining industry. Two years later businessman and developer Henry Griswold launched the Anacostia & Potomac River Railroad Co., the first streetcar east of the river. Horse-drawn cars carried passengers back and forth over the bridge from the Navy Yard to about this spot, and inspired Washingtonians with jobs across the river to settle here. Businesses opened near the streetcar stops to serve them. Griswold figured correctly that the streetcar was the key to selling property he owned. He quickly sold more than 200 lots on the hill to your right. Eventually he extended the line to Congress Heights and downtown Washington.

In 1900 speedier electric streetcars replaced the horsecars here, shortening the commute time to downtown and encouraging more residential development. In 1935 the Anacostia line was among the first in DC to be replaced with buses, which were considered cheaper to maintain, more flexible, and more modern. (Streetcar service was completely eliminated in Washington in 1962.) Anita F. Allen remembered when the streetcar tracks were removed. "One of the greatest events of our lives came after the new concrete was down and before traffic was allowed
Transit and Trade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 15, 2018
2. Transit and Trade Marker
again. For a few days we had a gloriously big roller skating rink that all the neighborhood children enjoyed."

Union Temple Baptist Church, founded in Anacostia in 1967, moved to this block in 1990. Under activist pastor Rev. Willie Wilson, the church has fought for community improvements and sponsored the annual Unifest.
 
Erected 2013 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 11 of 20.)
 
Location. 38° 51.896′ N, 76° 59.376′ W. Marker is in Anacostia, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Martin Luther King, Jr., Avenue, SE and W Street SE on Martin Luther King, Jr., Avenue, SE. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Big Chair (within shouting distance of this marker); The World’s Largest Chair (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Big Chair (within shouting distance of this marker); A Neighborhood Oasis (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mother Churches and Their Daughters (about 600 feet away); Crossing Lines
Transit and Trade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 15, 2018
3. Transit and Trade Marker
(about 600 feet away); Rose's Row (approx. 0.2 miles away); Booth's Escape (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anacostia.
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionIndustry & CommerceRailroads & StreetcarsRoads & Vehicles
 
Transit and Trade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 15, 2018
4. Transit and Trade Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 25, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 15, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 90 times since then. Last updated on January 18, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 15, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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