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Astoria in Clatsop County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

“Ocian in view, O! the Joy...”

 
 
"Ocian in view, O! the Joy..." Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2015
1. "Ocian in view, O! the Joy..." Marker
Inscription.
The Corps of Discovery traveled thousands of miles and endured many hardships to reach the Pacific Ocean in mid-November 1805. The last sixteen miles down the Columbia River took ten days because of bad weather. The explorers huddled among the rocks and drifted along the shore for nearly three weeks before crossing over to establish winter quarters at Fort Clatsop. ”It would be distressing to See our Situation, all wet and Colde,” lamented William Clark. Scouting expeditions searched for food and signs of trading vessels. These scouting parties were the first members of the expedition to see the mighty Pacific.

The locations of two campsites along the Columbia’s north shore may be seen from this vista: McGowan and Megler. Fort Clatsop (not visible) is located to the southwest across Youngs Bay on the Lewis and Clark River.
 
Erected by Erected by Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Lewis & Clark Expedition marker series.
 
Location. 46° 10.858′ N, 123° 49.128′ W. Marker is in Astoria, Oregon, in Clatsop County. Marker can be reached from Coxcomb Drive 0.7 miles from 15th Street. Touch for map.
"Ocian in view, O! the Joy..." Marker (<i>wide view; Young's Bay & Columbia River in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2015
2. "Ocian in view, O! the Joy..." Marker (wide view; Young's Bay & Columbia River in background)
Marker is located at the west end of the Astoria Column parking lot, at the hilltop end of Coxcomb Drive. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 Coxcomb Drive, Astoria OR 97103, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Lewis and Clark Expedition (here, next to this marker); Comcomly / Indian Burial Canoe (a few steps from this marker); Shively - McClure National Register Historic District (approx. 0.4 miles away); Columbia River Bar (approx. 0.6 miles away); Pilot Boat Peacock (approx. 0.6 miles away); Site of Original Settlement of Astoria (approx. 0.6 miles away); Ranald MacDonald (approx. 0.6 miles away); Fort Astoria (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Astoria.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lewis and Clark Expedition reaches the Pacific Ocean on November 15, 1805.
By the time they arrived at the ocean, Lewis and Clark knew that the Northwest Passage did not exist. Even if it had been possible to carry a canoe from the headwaters of the Missouri (in present-day Montana) and slide it into the nearest tributary of the Columbia, western rivers were not the slow, smooth waterways of the East. On the upper Missouri and on the
Marker detail: Thunderbird and the Condor image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2015
3. Marker detail: Thunderbird and the Condor
Discoveries unfolded daily for the expedition. Local encounters with the great California Condor were special opportunities for scientific observations. "I believed this to be the largest Bird of North America," exclaimed Clark.

The California Condor was the probable inspiration for the mythical Thunderbird of local Indian oral traditions. According to the Clatsops, Thunderbird landed in the beginning of time atop Saddle Mountain (visible to the southeast) and laid a nest of eggs. An old Giantess raided the nest throwing the eggs down the peak.
Columbia, the explorers faced rapids and cataracts that were bigger, swifter, and more dangerous than anything they had ever experienced. (Submitted on January 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Arrival at the Pacific Ocean.
While the rest of the Corps huddled in the gale-driven rain at Station Camp, Clark and ten of his men, plus his servant York, set out overland, on November 18, 1805, toward the Pacific Ocean. On the 19th, having hiked a total of 25 miles, they arrived at "the Comencment of an extencive Sand beech." "I proceeded on the Sandy Coast 4 miles," Clark reported, "and marked my name on a Small pine, the Day of the month & year, &c." The "&c." included "by land," as Lewis had carved on a tree at Cape Disappointment a few days earlier, thus officially marking the extent of their journey. (Submitted on January 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Lewis and Clark River, Oregon, as seen from Coxcomb Hill.
Captain Lewis first discovered the Lewis and Clark River on November 30, 1805, as he was exploring the Youngs Bay region. The first 100-yard-wide inlet, and the one to which they returned to expore, is today's Lewis and Clark River. The 2-mile-long inlet which they explored and enjoyed lunch along was today's Skipanon River. The Lewis and Clark expedition spent the winter of 1805-06 at Fort Clatsop on the left bank of
Marker detail: Astoria, Columbia River and Pacific Ocean Map image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2015
4. Marker detail: Astoria, Columbia River and Pacific Ocean Map
"Since we arrived in Sight of the Great Western; (for I cannot Say Pacific) Ocian as I have not Seen one pacific day Since my arrival..."
William Clark, December 1, 1805
the Lewis and Clark River, which they called "Ne-tul River". (Submitted on January 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationNative AmericansWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 22, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 33 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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