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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bucktown in Dorchester County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Finding Freedom

The Call of Freedom

 
 
Finding Freedom Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 20, 2018
1. Finding Freedom Marker
Inscription. Dorchester County occupies a central place in the story of the Underground Railroad, the secret network of "stations" and "conductors" that sheltered and shepherded hundreds of enslave African Americans to freedom in the mid-1800s. The famed Underground Railroad conductor Harriet Tubman grew up here in Bucktown.

An Act of Defiance

Young Harriet Tubman made her first stand against the injustice of slavery at Bucktown village store. While on an errand with a plantation cook, she encountered a white overseer disciplining a slave. The overseer ordered Tubman to help tie the slave down. She refused — an astonishing display of defiance for any slave, much less a girl of about age 13. The young man broke free, and the overseer picked up a two-pound weight and hurled it at him. Instead, he hit Tubman on the head with a blow that nearly killed her. Many historians believe this injury was linked to the frequent seizures Tubman experienced as an adult. These episodes were accompanied by vivid dreams that the deeply religious Tubman regarded as messages from God.

The Flight of the Dover Eight

In 1857, Thomas Elliot, Denwood Hughes, and Henry Predo fled from a nearby farm then owned by Prichett Meredith. The three joined five others in making the way north to freedom, but the group was
Finding Freedom Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 20, 2018
2. Finding Freedom Marker
The marker has been displaced from its frame and is lying against the north wall of the Bucktown Village Store.
betrayed by their conductor and led straight to jail in Dover, Delaware. Still, the “Dover Eight” managed to make a dramatic escape through the sheriff’s private living quarters and out a window. All eight found their way to freedom in Canada. There, Elliott and Hughes became supporters of anti-slavery activist John Brown.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway marker series.
 
Location. 38° 27.55′ N, 76° 1.869′ W. Marker is in Bucktown, Maryland, in Dorchester County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Bucktown Road and Greenbriar Road. Touch for map. This marker is on the north side of the Bucktown Village Store. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4303 Bucktown Road, Cambridge MD 21613, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Harriet Tubman (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named Finding Freedom (approx. 0.9 miles away); Pool One at Wildlife Drive (approx. 3½ miles away); Muskrat and Nutria (approx. 3.6 miles away); The Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem (approx. 3.6 miles away); The American Bald Eagle
The Bucktown Village Store image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 20, 2018
3. The Bucktown Village Store
(approx. 3.6 miles away); Delmarva Peninsula Fox Squirrel (approx. 4.1 miles away); Welcome to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (approx. 4.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bucktown.
 
Also see . . .  Bucktown Store. D-80, Maryland Historical Trust Maryland Inventory of Historic Properties Form. (Submitted on January 22, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansWomen
 
Harriet Tubman image. Click for full size.
Internet Archive
4. Harriet Tubman
“Harriet Tubman was cautious, cunning and brave. She penetrated the Rebel lines, told of their movements [and] brought back other information of great value.” — H. Bowley, 1939. Woodcut frontispiece (by J. C. Darby of Auburn) from Scenes in the Life of Harriet Tubman, Sarah Bradford, 1869.
Pritchett Meredith Farm image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 20, 2018
5. Pritchett Meredith Farm
Thomas Elliott, Denwood Hughes and Henry Predo from Bucktown in southern Dorchester County were among the “Dover Eight.” Elliott and Hughes were enslaved by Prichett Meredith and Predo was hired out to Meredith.
Close-up of photo on marker
National Underground Railroad<br>Network to Freedom image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 20, 2018
6. National Underground Railroad
Network to Freedom
You Are Here image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 20, 2018
7. You Are Here
Close-up of map on marker
$600 Reward image. Click for full size.
MD Archives
8. $600 Reward
Ran away from the subscriber, on Saturday night last, two Negro Men, called Denard Hughes and Tom Elliot.
        Denard is a very likely man, of dark chestnut color, stout built, with black whiskers; aged about 30 years; had on when he left a white hat with broad black band; his clothing is not recollected.
        Tom is of ordinary size, about five feet six inches high, of dark chestnut color, aged about 24 years; his clothing is not recollected. They both have a rather down look when spoken to.
        Tom has an uncle near Wilmington, called Moses Pinket.
        The above reward will be given for these Negroes if taken out of the county, or $100 for either if taken in the county. In either case they are to be lodged in the Cambridge jail, so that I get them again.
Pritchet Meridith
                 Near Cambridge, MD.
Baltimore Sun, March 13, 1857
The Bucktown Village Store image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 23, 2018
9. The Bucktown Village Store
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 6, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 22, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 64 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 22, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8, 9. submitted on January 24, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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