Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cisco in Eastland County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Oakwood Cemetery

 
 
Oakwood Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, January 22, 2018
1. Oakwood Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Dolphin William Bint (1845-1883) came to the United States from England in 1876 and settled in Eastland County in the Red Gap community. While on a journey to Fort Worth to buy lumber for their home, his wife gave birth to a stillborn son. His burial under an oak tree in the family’s pasture became the first in Oakwood Cemetery. The Bints relocated to Delmar (now Dothan) and their property was sold to the railway survey, a part of which was later donated to the cemetery in 1910. The first Cisco Cemetery Association was organized in 1899 to care for the cemetery. Shortly after receiving their charter in 1900, the members raised funds to enclose the grounds, erect gates, plant vegetation, and identify unmarked graves. In 1931, ten acres were added to the cemetery, and again in 1964 from the Cisco Independent School District. During the height of the Works Progress Administration (WPA), a 2,517 ft. rock wall was erected on three sides of the cemetery.

     The general landscape of the cemetery is traditional with granite, limestone, marble, and sandstone grave markers with a prominent WPA rock archway at the southeast entrance. A variety of natural vegetation, including mulberry, oak, red buds, crape myrtle, cedar, pine trees, and ferns afford shade and beauty to this historic burial site. Oakwood Cemetery is home to over 7,000
Oakwood Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, January 22, 2018
2. Oakwood Cemetery Marker
graves. More than six hundred burials are veterans of the Civil War, the Spanish-American War, World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. The Cisco Cemetery Association organized in 1976 to establish a trust fund and provide care for the cemetery, while also serving the community of Cisco.

Historic Texas Cemetery - 2010

 
Erected 2011 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 17003.)
 
Location. 32° 23.484′ N, 98° 59.448′ W. Marker is in Cisco, Texas, in Eastland County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of W. 2nd Street and Avenue J. Touch for map. Marker is located in the north central part of Oakwood Cemetery near the cemetery maintenance building and office. Marker is in this post office area: Cisco TX 76437, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. First Presbyterian Church of Cisco (approx. 0.4 miles away); Old Mobley Hotel (approx. 0.6 miles away); First United Methodist Church of Cisco (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Bankhead Highway (approx. 0.6 miles away); First National Bank (approx. 0.7 miles
Oakwood Cemetery near Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, January 22, 2018
3. Oakwood Cemetery near Marker
away); Cisco College (approx. 0.7 miles away); First Baptist Church of Cisco (approx. 0.7 miles away); Dothan Cemetery (approx. 7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cisco.
 
Also see . . .  Oakwood Cemetery. From the findagrave.com website. (Submitted on January 30, 2018.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial Sites
 
Rock Archway Entrance to Oakwood Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, January 22, 2018
4. Rock Archway Entrance to Oakwood Cemetery
Constructed by Works Progress Administration in the 1930s
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 30, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 30, 2018, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 78 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 30, 2018, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
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