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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Navy Yard in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Saint Paul African Union Methodist Protestant (AUMP) Church

African American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC

 

401 I Street SE

 
Saint Paul African Union Methodist Protestant (AUMP) Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
1. Saint Paul African Union Methodist Protestant (AUMP) Church Marker
Inscription.
The St. Paul African Union Methodist Protestant (AUMP) Church is the first and only church in Washington, DC that evolved from what is considered the oldest incorporated, independent African American denomination in the country. The AUMP Church, founded in Wilmington, Delaware in 1805 by the formerly enslaved Peter Spencer (1782-1843), was incorporated in 1813, some three years before the more prevalent African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. The St. Paul AUMP Church was built in 1924 and designed by Romulus C. Archer, Jr. (1890-1968), the second African American architect to be registered in the District of Columbia. The St. Paul AUMP Church is the only surviving house of worship from the predominantly African American community that was once located between the Capitol and the Navy Yard. Most of this northern Navy Yard neighborhood, which started developing in the early 19th century, was razed in the late 1930s and early 1940s for public housing that was subsequently replaced by the housing seen today.

This plaque is dedicated to Pastor Karen Mills (1960-2014), a gifted and loving spiritual leader, who was instrumental in attaining historical status for the church.

Image caption:
St. Paul AUMP Church with original stained glass windows, September 4, 1950.
Historical Society of Washington,
Saint Paul African Union Methodist Protestant (AUMP) Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
2. Saint Paul African Union Methodist Protestant (AUMP) Church Marker
D.C., John P. Wymer collection
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Washington, DC African American Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 52.756′ N, 77° 0.021′ W. Marker is in Navy Yard, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on I Street Southeast east of 4th Street SE, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 401 I Street SE, Washington DC 20003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Walk on the Canal (approx. 0.2 miles away); One of DC's Oldest Neighborhoods (approx. 0.2 miles away); 1817 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Railroad Freight Car Truck and Tracks (approx. 0.2 miles away); Washington Navy Yard and Annex (approx. 0.2 miles away); 1830 (approx. 0.2 miles away); 1860 (approx. 0.2 miles away); 1840-1950 (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Navy Yard.
 
Also see . . .
1. St. Paul African Union Methodist Protestant Church. (Submitted on February 5, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.)
2. St. Paul AUMP Church Celebrates 90 Years Of Neighborhood Continuity. (Submitted on February 5, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.)
3. St. Paul AUMP Church : A Church With a Rich History Fighting for Thier Future. YouTube
Saint Paul AUMP Church image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
3. Saint Paul AUMP Church
video (Submitted on February 5, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansArchitectureChurches & ReligionWomen
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 7, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 2, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 77 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 2, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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