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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Shaw in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Infantry / With Freedom Came Their Churches

 
 
Infantry / With Freedom Came Their Churches Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
1. Infantry / With Freedom Came Their Churches Marker
Inscription.
(front)
Infantry

There were one hundred and forty-two infantry regiments in the Bureau of the United States Colored Troops

Private James Smith
Image donated by his descendants, family of Robert Smith
(back)
With Freedom Came Their Churches

In the summer of 1862, President Abraham Lincoln attended church services at Camp Barker, a Freedman's village located in northwest Washington City. The headquarters of the camp was located between R and S Streets, NW, with the east and west boundary of Vermont on the east, and 13th Street on the West. Three churches were built in that vicinity immediately after the Civil War. The church has historically bee one of the most vital institutions in America's African descent communities. Churches in the Greater U Street Corridor provided the foundation for a Freedmen's village of runaways to become one of the most affluent African American communities in the country.

(captions)
Saint Augustine Catholic Church, 1899: The church was founded as a separate African American parish in 1867.
Courtesy of the Library of Congress

The Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church, 1899: The church was founded in 1841 as the First
Infantry / With Freedom Came Their Churches Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
2. Infantry / With Freedom Came Their Churches Marker
Colored Presbyterian Church by Reverend John F. Cook. Reverend Henry Garnet served as pastor of the church from 1864 to 1866.
Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Metropolitan A.M.E. Church, 1899: The church was established by the merger of two of the older A.M.E. churches in the District of Columbia. Officially designated as Metropolitan in 1872, the cornerstone of the edifice was laid in 1881.
Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Metropolitan Baptist Church, 1899: The church was founded as the Fourth Baptist Church during the Civil War. Under the leadership of Reverent Bailey, ten freed men formed a congregation met in tents near Camp Barker.
Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Freedmen's Village, established the summer of 1862.
Courtesy of the National Archives

Vermont Avenue Baptist Church, 1899: Seven freedmen founded the church in 1866 as the Fifth Baptist Church. They called as their first pastor Reverend John H. Brooks, a former Union Army teamster.
Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Lincoln Temple United Church of Christ, 1928: The church was founded in 1870.
Scurlock Studio
Courtesy of the National Museum of American History Archives


Annual baptism
Infantry / With Freedom Came Their Churches Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
3. Infantry / With Freedom Came Their Churches Marker
at the Griffith Stadium by Elder Michaux of the Church of God, 1930
Scurlock Studio
Courtesy of the National Museum of American History Archives


Baptism procession
Scurlock Studio
Courtesy of the National Museum of American History Archives


Shiloh Baptist Church clock unveiling in celebration of its 84th Anniversary: The church was founded in Fredericksburg, Virginia before the Civil War. The Union Army used the church building as a hospital in 1861, and about 400 members made their way to Washington, DC. The Washington church elected its first pastor, Reverent William Walker, in 1863.
Scurlock Studio
Courtesy of the National Museum of American History Archives


Bishop Charles Emmanuel "Sweet Daddy" Grace, founder of the United House of Prayer for All People, is seated at the front.
Scurlock Studio
Courtesy of the National Museum of American History Archives

 
Erected by African American Civil War Museum.
 
Location. 38° 54.985′ N, 77° 1.504′ W. Marker is in Shaw, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from Vermont Avenue NW south of U Street NW, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located outside the African American Civil War Memorial & Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1939 Vermont Ave NW, Washington DC 20001, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cavalry / With Freedom Came Their Schools (here, next to this marker); Artillery / With Freedom Came Their Cultural Icons (here, next to this marker); Musicians / With Freedom Came Their Businesses (a few steps from this marker); Pioneers / With Freedom Came Their Community (a few steps from this marker); Sailors / With Freedom Came the Greater YOU (a few steps from this marker); African American Civil War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Scurlock Studio Site (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Civil War Camp to Victorian Neighborhood (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Shaw.
 
Also see . . .  African American Civil War Memorial & Museum. (Submitted on February 6, 2018.)
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches & ReligionWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 6, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 3, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 57 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 3, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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