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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Otter Rock in Lincoln County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Cape Foulweather

Central Oregon Coast History

 
 
Cape Foulweather Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 7, 2015
1. Cape Foulweather Marker
Inscription.
Cape Foulweather was discovered by Captain James Cook, the English explorer on March 7, 1778. The weather was particularly stormy on the day of his discovery (winds of 100 MPH at the cape are not unusual).

Captain Cook named the location Cape Foulweather, the first geographic location named on his voyage to the north Pacific coast. Once accounts of this voyage were published, world interest was aroused and the fur trade followed.
 
Erected by Lincoln County Historical Society.
 
Location. 44° 45.622′ N, 124° 3.987′ W. Marker is near Otter Rock, Oregon, in Lincoln County. Marker can be reached from Otter Crest Loop west of Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in Otter Crest State Scenic Viewpoint, at the west end of the parking lot, overlooking Cape Foulweather and the Pacific Ocean. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4905 Otter Crest Loop, Otter Rock OR 97369, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Oregon’s Rocky Shores (approx. 0.9 miles away); Devil's Punchbowl (approx. 0.9 miles away); Roy Bower and Jack Chambers Memorial
Cape Foulweather Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 7, 2015
2. Cape Foulweather Marker (wide view)
(approx. 3.6 miles away); It's a Long Way Up (approx. 5.8 miles away); A Keeper's Work Was Never Done (approx. 5.8 miles away); A Family Affair (approx. 5.8 miles away); South to Newport (approx. 5.8 miles away); Newport, Oregon (approx. 8.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Large, painted wooden, billboard-style marker
 
Also see . . .
1. James Cook (1728-1779).
Cook first sighted North America in early March 1778, after sailing from Hawai’i. The naming of Cape Foulweather is documented in Voyages on March 7. The land formed a point at the northern extreme, which Captain Cook named Cape Foulweather, "from the exceeding bad weather we afterwards met with.” Cook’s map provided the first cartographic description of the North Pacific and included textual descriptions of a valuable commodity, luxurious sea otter furs that could be acquired through trade with North Pacific Native people. News of the potential sea-otter trade stimulated a rush to the region and a new trans-Pacific trade with China. (Submitted on February 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Cape Foulweather’s Look-Out Observatory.
Workers had several obstacles to overcome in building on
Cape Foulweather Lookout image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 7, 2015
3. Cape Foulweather Lookout
the triangular point on the southwest corner of the promontory; the steepness of the hillside, with the Pacific Ocean 500 feet below, and ground that was solid basalt from an ancient volcano. According to old records, large steel rods – wrapped in copper to prevent erosion – were sunk into the basalt. The foundation is an 18-inch cement base anchored into rock, and the concrete walls reinforced with 1-inch steel all the way to the roofline. The walls are 16 inches thick at the footings and taper to 8 inches at the top. (Submitted on February 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Oregon History: Some Came by Sea.
In 1778 Captain James Cook, aboard H.M.S. Resolution, made a landfall on the central Oregon coast. He commemorated the day by naming the headland Cape Foulweather. A famed mariner who had twice before explored the Pacific, Cook was sent to find the Northwest Passage, a mythical sea route through the continent. He could not find what did not exist, but Cook sailed north to the Arctic Ocean and charted much of the outer coast. (Submitted on February 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Exploration
 
Cape Foulweather (<i>view from near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 7, 2015
4. Cape Foulweather (view from near marker)
Cape Foulweather (<i>view north from near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 7, 2015
5. Cape Foulweather (view north from near marker)
Cape Foulweather (<i>view south from near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 7, 2015
6. Cape Foulweather (view south from near marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 5, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 68 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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