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Paisley in Lake County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Ranching - A way of Life

 
 
Ranching - A way of Life Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2016
1. Ranching - A way of Life Marker
Inscription.
The 19th century brought significant changes to this region. In 1843, Captain John C. Fremont explored and mapped this area. By the 1870s, most of the region's Native American inhabitants were removed to distant reservations. Homesteaders arrived in the late 19th century bringing cattle, sheep, and agricultural crops. They established farms, ranches, sawmills, and many of the region's small towns.

Settlers looking for wide-open range settled near Paisley. This fertile land was ideal for raising sheep or cattle and farming feed grains and grasses. By 1870, this small town began to grow and three years later, the post office was established. Paisley's scenic landscape is a reminder of those early days, with many of the local geological features bearing the namesake of early Paisley pioneers such as Harvey Creek, Withers Lake, and Brattain Butte.

Many descendants of early settlers are still in the area today, evident by the area's "Century Farms" – family farms operated for at least 100 years. Families pass their skills and knowledge onto the next generation and new homes are built next to the old.

The local economy is based mainly on cattle ranching, farming, the USDA Forest Service, and recreational tourism. The ZX Ranch, which is headquartered south of Paisley, is one of
Marker detail: Chewaucan River image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2016
2. Marker detail: Chewaucan River
The Chewaucan River runs through Paisley and offers miles of fishing, swimming, and picturesque photography opportunities.
the largest working cattle ranches in North America and is home to over 100 varieties of birds. Mule deer, pronghorn, bobcat, cougar, and coyote also roam the land.

Ranching is a primary occupation in Lake County. Many buckaroos settled in this area to work ranches and some still ride a horse to get the job done. Night and day, they cared for the cattle, birthing calves in freezing temperatures, and keeping an eye open for predatory coyotes and mountain lions.
 
Location. 42° 41.58′ N, 120° 32.692′ W. Marker is in Paisley, Oregon, in Lake County. Marker is at the intersection of Fremont Highway (Oregon Route 31) and Chewaucan Street, on the right when traveling north on Fremont Highway. Touch for map. Marker is located within the Oregon Outback Scenic Byway kiosk, just north of the highway on the west side of Chewaucan Street. Marker is in this post office area: Paisley OR 97636, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Paisley's History (here, next to this marker); Paisley United Methodist Church (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line).
 
Also see . . .
1. Buckaroo Life on the ZX.
In a remote corner of Oregon, cowboys on one of the country's largest ranches fight a tough climate to keep their traditions alive and manage a 10,000-head herd. In the late 1800s,the
Marker detail: ZX Ranch image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2016
3. Marker detail: ZX Ranch
Kern County Land and Cattle Company owned the ZX land. At the time,the Chewaucan River meandered through the valley bottom,regularly overflowing its banks and flooding the land. Pastures now suitable for thousands of cows were,at that time,a vast wetland and bog. Within four years,the Kern men dredged the bog,built irrigation canals and rechanneled the river. Today,the resulting meadows provide abundant cattle feed. (Submitted on February 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Chewaucan River.
The Chewaucan flows through Paisley and into what was once the Upper Chewaucan Marsh east of the town. The marsh is now pasture land, and the river’s flow through this area is controlled by a system of weirs and irrigation canals. (Submitted on February 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. AgricultureExplorationNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
Marker detail: Ranch horses image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2016
4. Marker detail: Ranch horses
Many buckaroos settled in this area to work ranches and some still ride a horse to get the job done.
Marker detail: Chewaucan River image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2016
5. Marker detail: Chewaucan River
The Northern Paiute named the valley’s river – Chewaucan.
Ranching - A way of Life Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2016
6. Ranching - A way of Life Marker (wide view)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 6, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 39 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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