Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Andersonville in Macon County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Grave Markers

 
 
Grave Markers Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, December 26, 2017
1. Grave Markers Marker
Inscription.

Grave Markers
In the summer of 1867 someone photographed the prisoners’ graves from this same perspective. Names and unit numbers in the historic photo match the information on the present headstones.

The markers in the photograph are wooden headboards. In 1878 they were replaced by these marble headstones; otherwise this part of the cemetery has changed little since the Civil War.
 
Location. 32° 12.137′ N, 84° 7.912′ W. Marker is in Andersonville, Georgia, in Macon County. Marker is on Cemetery Road north of Prison Site Road, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Andersonville GA 31711, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Raiders' Graves (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Memorial to American Former Prisoners of War Stalag XVII-B (about 500 feet away); 3 - inch Ordnance Rifle (approx. 0.4 miles away); 6 - pounder Field Gun (approx. 0.4 miles away); Memorial Day Order (approx. 0.4 miles away); Wisconsin (approx. 0.4 miles away); Clara Barton (approx. 0.4 miles away); Lizabeth A. Turner (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Andersonville.
 
Also see . . .  The Story of the Headstones at Andersonville National Cemetery
Grave Markers Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, December 26, 2017
2. Grave Markers Marker
The headstones have been decorated for the Christmas season. The 1912 Illinois Monument can be seen in the background.
. "Thousands of "unknown" Civil War soldiers, Union and Confederate, lie in cemeteries across the nation. Many died in battle, many in prison camps. The lack of record keeping, the lack of a formal identification system (dog tags were not required) and the high number of battle deaths combined to create the large number of soldiers interred without a name associated to an individual gravesite." (Submitted on February 9, 2018, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 9, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 9, 2018, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 71 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 9, 2018, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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