Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oregon City in Clackamas County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Coyote Creates Willamette Falls

Clackmas Chinook

 
 
Coyote Creates Willamette Falls Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 25, 2017
1. Coyote Creates Willamette Falls Marker
Caption: (bottom right) Designed by Greg Archuleta, Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde.
Inscription. Coyote came to that place around Oregon City and found the people there very hungry. The river was full of salmon, but they had no way to spear them in the deep water. Coyote decided he would build a big waterfall, so that the salmon would come to the surface for spearing. Then he would build a fish trap there too.
First, he tried at the mouth of Pudding River, but it was no good, and all he made was the gravel bar there. So he went on down the river to Rock Island, and it was better, but after making the rapids there he gave up again and went further down still. Where the Willamette Falls are now he found just the right place, and he made the Falls high and wide. All the Indians came and began to fish.
Now Coyote made his magic fish trap. He made it so it would speak, and say "Noseepsk" when it was full. Because he was pretty hungry, Coyote decided to try it first himself. He set the trap by the Falls, and then ran back up the shore to prepare to make a cooking-fire. But he had only begun when the trap called out, "Noseepsk!" He hurried back; indeed the trap was full of salmon. Running back with them, he started his fire again, but the fish trap cried "Noseepsk! Noseepsk!" It happened again and again; the fifth time Coyote became angry and said to the trap, "What, can't you wait with your fish-catching until I've built a
Coyote Creates Willamette Falls Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 25, 2017
2. Coyote Creates Willamette Falls Marker
fire?" The trap was very offended by Coyote's impatience, and stopped working right then. So after that the people had to spear their salmon as best they could.

From "Coyote Was There, Indian Literature in Oregon Country" compiled and edited by Jarold Ramsey. Story originally told by Louis LaBonte, son of the daughter of Chief Caboway of the Clatsops and recored by H.S. Lyman, 1900.
 
Erected by End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center.
 
Location. 45° 21.867′ N, 122° 35.705′ W. Marker is in Oregon City, Oregon, in Clackamas County. Marker can be reached from Washington Street near Abernethy Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1726 Washington Street, Oregon City OR 97045, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Coyote Creates Willamette Falls (here, next to this marker); The Confederate Tribes of Grande Ronde Today (here, next to this marker); Oregon (a few steps from this marker); Dr. John McLoughlin (a few steps from this marker); To The Banks Of The Willamette (a few steps from this marker); The Trail of Tears (a few steps from this marker); Wagons (within shouting distance of this marker); Clackamas Chinook (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oregon City.
 
More about this marker. This marker is located next to the End Of Oregon Trail Interpretive Center facing outward towards Abernethy Green.
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 13, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 13, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 101 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 13, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.