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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Corbett in Multnomah County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Chanticleer Point

A View and a Vision

 
 
Chanticleer Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2015
1. Chanticleer Point Marker
Inscription.
Demands for a good road paralleling the Columbia River began with emigration along the rugged Oregon Trail in 1843. But it took Samuel Hill and this view to help make the dream a reality.

Sam Hill, an eccentric and wealthy railroad attorney, was a passionate "good roads" enthusiast with a flair for publicity. On August 27, 1913, Hill and other advocates for a Columbia River Highway, met with Multnomah County Commissioners on this bluff at the Chanticleer Inn. With this dramatic vista in the background, Hill and engineer Samuel C. Lancaster outlined the vision of a scenic highway where "tired men and women… may enjoy the wild beauty of nature's art gallery and recreate themselves.” Construction surveys were under way within a month and by the 1920s the Historic Columbia River Highway was called the “king of roads.”
 
Location. 45° 32.021′ N, 122° 15.616′ W. Marker is near Corbett, Oregon, in Multnomah County. Marker can be reached from Historic Columbia River Highway west of East Knieriem Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located beside the parking lot, at the Portland Women's Forum Scenic State Viewpoint, overlooking the Columbia River. Marker is at or near this postal address: 39210 Historic Columbia River Highway, Corbett OR 97019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Marker detail: Chanticleer Inn image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2015
2. Marker detail: Chanticleer Inn
Chanticleer Inn, constructed in 1912, occupied this bluff until destroyed by fire in 1931. The inn was one of several roadhouses providing elegant accommodations for travelers along the Historic Columbia River Highway at the dawn of the automobile age.
At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Samuel Hill – “Road Builder” (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Chanticleer Point (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Vista House (approx. 0.8 miles away); Marshall N. Dana (approx. 0.9 miles away); Samuel C. Lancaster (approx. 0.9 miles away); Broughton’s Expedition (approx. one mile away); Corbett (approx. 1.6 miles away); Tad's Chicken 'N Dumplin's (approx. 5.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Corbett.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Chanticleer Inn Columbia River Highway.
Built in 1912, about 25 miles east of Portland, on an elevation high above the bank of the Columbia River, the Chanticleer Inn hosted many a General, several Presidents and many foreign dignitaries. Before the Columbia River Highway was opened in 1915, the only way to reach Chanticleer was by taking a boat or the train to Rooster Rock and then riding or walking up the steep, unpaved road. After the highway opened, Chanticleer welcomed even more hungry motorists. (Submitted on February 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The King of Roads.
The Columbia River Highway, later renamed the Historic Columbia River Highway (HRCH), was
Marker detail: winding curves image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2015
3. Marker detail: winding curves
The Historic Highway descends over 600 feet from Crown Point to near river level. Committed to maintaining a 5 percent grade, Samuel Lancaster designed graceful viaducts and a series of winding curves, called the figure eight loops.
a technical and civic achievement of its time, successfully marrying ambitious engineering with sensitive treatment of the surrounding magnificent landscape. The Historic Columbia River Highway has gained national significance because it represents one of the earlier applications of cliff-face road building utilizing modern highway construction technologies. It is also the oldest scenic highway in the United States. (Submitted on February 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Samuel C. Lancaster.
Samuel Christopher Lancaster was an engineer and landscape architect, most famous for his work on the Columbia River Highway. He was born in 1864 in Magnolia, Mississippi. He came to Oregon in 1908 and was hired by Sam Hill to design his experimental roads at Maryhill in 1909. He did a plan for the campus of Linfield College before beginning supervision of the Columbia River Highway in 1913. (Submitted on February 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Roads & Vehicles
 
Marker detail: Samuel C. Lancaster <i>Engineer, 1915</i> image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2015
4. Marker detail: Samuel C. Lancaster Engineer, 1915
"Standing here I realized the magnitude of my task and the splendid opportunity presented. Instinctively there came a prayer for strong men, and that we might have sense enough to do the thing in the right way... so as not to mar what God had put there..."
Columbia River Gorge (<i>view northeast from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2015
5. Columbia River Gorge (view northeast from marker)
Portland Women's Forum sign (<i>sign on highway near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2015
6. Portland Women's Forum sign (sign on highway near marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 14, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 88 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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